Introduction

Idiomatic expressions are a fascinating aspect of language learning, providing insight into the culture and thinking of native speakers. Often colorful and intriguing, these phrases don’t always mean what they literally say. Instead, they convey figurative meanings that can enrich a language learner’s vocabulary and enable more authentic communication. Among these idioms, expressions linked to body parts are common and varied across languages. This article aims to explore some popular idioms associated with body parts in the English language.

English idioms related to the body part “arm”

Arm in arm

Use this idiom when you want to describe two people walking or standing closely together, with their arms linked. It signifies a strong bond or closeness between the individuals.

Example: The couple strolled through the park arm in arm, enjoying each other’s company.

Twist someone’s arm

Use this idiom when you want to describe persuading or convincing someone to do something they are initially hesitant about. It implies applying pressure or using persuasive tactics.

Example: I didn’t want to go to the party, but my friends twisted my arm and convinced me to join them.

Have an arm and a leg

Use this idiom when you want to describe something as being very expensive or costing a significant amount of money. It emphasizes the high price or value.

Example: The designer handbag looked great, but it would cost me an arm and a leg, so I decided against buying it.

Give your right arm

Use this idiom when you want to convey a strong willingness or eagerness to make a sacrifice or offer something valuable.

Example: She would give her right arm for a chance to study at that prestigious university.

Keep someone at arm’s length

Use this idiom when you want to describe maintaining a certain distance or avoiding a close relationship with someone. It implies a cautious or reserved approach.

Example: After their disagreement, she decided to keep her colleague at arm’s length and minimize their interactions.

Long arm of the law

Use this idiom when you want to describe the far-reaching power or authority of the legal system or law enforcement.

Example: The criminal was eventually caught by the long arm of the law, no matter how far he tried to run.

Right-hand man

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who is the most trusted or relied upon assistant or supporter of a person in a position of power.

Example: The CEO’s right-hand man is instrumental in making important decisions and managing the company’s operations.

Up in arms

Use this idiom when you want to describe a state of anger, protest, or outrage about a particular issue or situation.

Example: The citizens were up in arms over the proposed construction project that would destroy a local park.

Work your fingers to the bone

Use this idiom when you want to describe working extremely hard or putting in a lot of effort, often to the point of exhaustion.

Example: She worked her fingers to the bone to complete the project before the deadline.

Armed to the teeth

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone or something that is heavily armed or well-equipped with weapons or resources.

Example: The soldiers were armed to the teeth, ready to defend their country against any threat.

Open arms

Use this idiom when you want to describe a warm, welcoming, and accepting attitude towards someone or something.

Example: When she returned after a long trip, her family greeted her with open arms, happy to have her back.

Keep someone at arm’s reach

Use this idiom when you want to describe maintaining a certain distance or avoiding close involvement or connection with someone. It suggests being cautious or wary of that person.

Example: After their disagreement, she decided to keep her coworker at arm’s reach, minimizing interactions to avoid further conflict.

Strong-arm tactics

Use this idiom when you want to describe the use of force, intimidation, or aggressive methods to achieve a goal or gain control.

Example: The company resorted to strong-arm tactics to suppress union activities and discourage employee dissent.

In the arms of Morpheus

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone being asleep or in a state of deep sleep.

Example: After a long day at work, she quickly fell into the arms of Morpheus and enjoyed a restful night’s sleep.

Fall into someone’s arms

Use this idiom when you want to describe seeking comfort, support, or refuge from someone in a time of distress or difficulty.

Example: When she received the heartbreaking news, she fell into her best friend’s arms, seeking solace and consolation.

English idioms related to the body part “leg”

Break a leg

Use this idiom when you want to wish someone good luck, particularly before a performance or event. It is commonly used in the entertainment industry.

Example: “Break a leg!” the director said to the actors before they went on stage for the play.

On your last legs

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone or something that is in a very weak or deteriorating state, often nearing the end of its lifespan or capability.

Example: The old computer is on its last legs; it’s time to invest in a new one.

Pull someone’s leg

Use this idiom when you want to playfully tease or joke with someone, often by telling them something that is not true, with the intention of making them believe it momentarily.

Example: “I can’t believe you fell for it! I was just pulling your leg with that outrageous story.”

Get a leg up

Use this idiom when you want to describe getting an advantage or a head start in a situation. It implies gaining a favorable position or opportunity.

Example: Her previous experience working in a similar field gave her a leg up when applying for the new job.

Shake a leg

Use this idiom when you want to encourage someone to hurry up or move quickly. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

Example: “We’re running late! Come on, shake a leg or we’ll miss the bus.”

Cost an arm and a leg

Use this idiom when you want to describe something as being very expensive or costing a significant amount of money. It emphasizes the high price or value.

Example: The luxury car he bought cost him an arm and a leg, but he considered it worth the investment.

Stand on your own two feet

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone being independent and self-sufficient, able to take care of themselves without relying on others.

Example: After years of support from her parents, it was time for her to stand on her own two feet and become financially independent.

Leg it

Use this idiom when you want to describe the act of running or moving quickly, usually on foot.

Example: The bus was about to leave, so she had to leg it to the bus stop to catch it in time.

Get your legs under the table

Use this idiom when you want to describe the process of becoming comfortable and established in a new place or situation, often referring to someone new joining a group or organization.

Example: It took him a few weeks, but he finally got his legs under the table at his new job and started feeling more confident.

Keep a leg up

Use this idiom when you want to describe maintaining an advantage or staying ahead of others in a competitive or challenging situation.

Example: To stay competitive in the market, the company always strives to keep a leg up on the competition through continuous innovation.

Leapfrog over

Use this idiom when you want to describe surpassing or skipping ahead of others, often in terms of progress, achievements, or success.

Example: With his exceptional performance, he managed to leapfrog over his colleagues and secure a promotion.

Have a leg to stand on

Use this idiom when you want to describe having a valid or logical basis for an argument, opinion, or claim.

Example: Before presenting your case, make sure you have a leg to stand on with sufficient evidence and supporting facts.

Stand on one leg

Use this idiom when you want to describe being in a difficult or unstable position, lacking balance or support.

Example: The negotiations were challenging, and it felt like we were standing on one leg throughout the process.

Not have a leg to stand on

Use this idiom when you want to describe having no valid or credible evidence or argument to support a claim or position.

Example: The defendant didn’t have a leg to stand on; the evidence against him was overwhelming.

Run like the wind

Use this idiom when you want to describe running extremely fast or with great speed.

Example: He trained hard and was able to run like the wind during the track meet, leaving his competitors far behind.

English idioms related to the body part “heart”

Follow your heart

Use this idiom when you want to encourage someone to make decisions based on their own feelings, desires, or instincts rather than logical reasoning or external influences.

Example: “I can’t tell you what to do, but I suggest you follow your heart and do what feels right for you.”

Break someone’s heart

Use this idiom when you want to describe the feeling of deep emotional pain or sadness caused by a romantic disappointment or loss.

Example: “It broke her heart when she found out that he had been lying to her all along.”

Have a change of heart

Use this idiom when you want to describe a sudden shift or reversal in someone’s feelings, opinions, or decisions.

Example: “Initially, he didn’t want to go, but he had a change of heart and decided to join us on the trip.”

Take something to heart

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone deeply and personally internalizing or being affected by something, often criticism or advice.

Example: “She took the feedback to heart and worked hard to improve her performance.”

Heart of gold

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who is kind, generous, and caring at their core.

Example: “She may seem tough on the outside, but she has a heart of gold and is always there to help others.”

Lose heart

Use this idiom when you want to describe losing confidence, hope, or motivation in a particular situation or endeavor.

Example: “Despite facing multiple setbacks, she refused to lose heart and continued to pursue her dreams.”

Wear your heart on your sleeve

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who openly and visibly expresses their emotions, without hiding or restraining them.

Example: “She wears her heart on her sleeve, always showing exactly how she feels about things.”

Half-hearted

Use this idiom when you want to describe something that is done without enthusiasm, commitment, or full effort.

Example: “He made a half-hearted attempt to apologize, but it didn’t seem sincere.”

Cross your heart (and hope to die)

Use this idiom when you want to emphasize the truthfulness or sincerity of a statement or promise, often used by children in a playful or solemn manner.

Example: “Cross my heart, I’ll keep your secret safe.”

Close to your heart

Use this idiom when you want to describe something that is deeply important, cherished, or valued by someone.

Example: “Education is a cause that is close to her heart; she dedicates her time and resources to improving access to quality education.”

Learn something by heart

Use this idiom when you want to describe memorizing something completely, such as lines from a play, a poem, or important information.

Example: “She learned the song by heart and performed it flawlessly at the concert.”

Take heart

Use this idiom when you want to encourage someone to find hope or inspiration in a difficult situation.

Example: “Take heart; even though things seem tough right now, there is always a way forward.”

Win someone’s heart

Use this idiom when you want to describe capturing someone’s affection, love, or admiration.

Example: “He won her heart with his kindness and thoughtfulness.”

Steal someone’s heart

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone becoming deeply and instantly enamored or infatuated with someone else.

Example: “Her charisma and charm stole his heart from the moment they met.”

From the bottom of your heart

Use this idiom when you want to emphasize the sincerity or genuineness of a feeling, action, or expression.

Example: “Thank you from the bottom of my heart for your support and encouragement.”

English idioms related to the body part “mind”

Mind over matter

Use this idiom when you want to emphasize the power of mental strength or willpower to overcome physical challenges or obstacles.

Example: “Even though he was tired, he pushed himself to finish the race, demonstrating the power of mind over matter.”

Change your mind

Use this idiom when you want to describe the act of altering or revising your opinion, decision, or intention.

Example: “Initially, she wanted to go to the party, but she changed her mind at the last minute and decided to stay home.”

Mind your own business

Use this idiom when you want to tell someone to focus on their own affairs or concerns rather than interfering in others’ matters.

Example: “Instead of gossiping about others, it’s better to mind your own business and concentrate on your own life.”

Blow your mind

Use this idiom when you want to describe something that is incredibly impressive, surprising, or mind-boggling.

Example: “The performance by the acrobats was breathtaking and completely blew my mind.”

Make up your mind

Use this idiom when you want to encourage someone to make a decision or reach a conclusion about something.

Example: “We’ve been discussing vacation plans for weeks; it’s time to make up our minds and book the tickets.”

Out of your mind

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone as being irrational, crazy, or not thinking clearly.

Example: “Jumping off a moving train? Are you out of your mind? That’s extremely dangerous!”

Slip your mind

Use this idiom when you want to describe forgetting something, especially something that you had intended to remember or mention.

Example: “I’m sorry I didn’t bring the documents; it completely slipped my mind this morning.”

Have a one-track mind

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who is constantly preoccupied or focused on a single topic or thought.

Example: “He has a one-track mind when it comes to food; he’s always thinking about what he’ll eat next.”

Bear in mind

Use this idiom when you want to remind someone to consider or remember a particular fact, piece of information, or perspective.

Example: “When making your decision, bear in mind the potential consequences and long-term implications.”

Set your mind to

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone determined or committed to achieving a specific goal or task.

Example: “She set her mind to learning a new language and dedicated herself to daily practice and study.”

Mind the gap

Use this idiom when you want to caution someone to be aware of a potential danger or space, especially when boarding or disembarking from a train or subway.

Example: “As you step off the train, mind the gap between the platform and the train.”

Have a mind of its own

Use this idiom when you want to describe something that behaves independently or unpredictably, not under your full control.

Example: “My hair always has a mind of its own; no matter how much I try to style it, it does its own thing.”

Read someone’s mind

Use this idiom when you want to describe understanding someone’s thoughts or intentions without them expressing them explicitly.

Example: “She handed him exactly what he was thinking about; it was as if she could read his mind.”

Keep an open mind

Use this idiom when you want to encourage someone to be receptive, accepting, or willing to consider new ideas, opinions, or perspectives.

Example: “When exploring different cultures, it’s important to keep an open mind and respect their customs and traditions.”

Absent-minded

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who often forgets things or is easily distracted, often due to being lost in thought.

Example: “He’s so absent-minded; he frequently misplaces his keys and forgets important appointments.”

English idioms related to the body part “head”

Head over heels

Use this idiom when you want to describe being deeply and completely in love or infatuated with someone.

Example: “Ever since they met, he’s been head over heels for her, unable to stop thinking about her.”

Keep your head up

Use this idiom when you want to encourage someone to remain positive, resilient, and confident, especially in difficult or challenging situations.

Example: “I know you’re going through a tough time, but keep your head up; things will get better.”

Hit the nail on the head

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone expressing or identifying something exactly right or accurately.

Example: “She hit the nail on the head with her analysis of the issue; she understood it perfectly.”

Head in the clouds

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who is daydreaming or not paying attention to their surroundings, often due to being lost in their thoughts or imagination.

Example: “She often has her head in the clouds during class, not fully focused on the lecture.”

Get inside someone’s head

Use this idiom when you want to describe understanding someone’s thoughts, motivations, or mindset.

Example: “He’s so unpredictable; it’s hard to get inside his head and know what he’ll do next.”

Blow your mind

Use this idiom when you want to describe something that is incredibly impressive, surprising, or mind-boggling.

Example: “The stunning view from the mountaintop completely blew my mind; it was unlike anything I had ever seen before.”

Off the top of your head

Use this idiom when you want to say something without thinking or planning beforehand, often referring to spontaneous or initial thoughts or ideas.

Example: “I can’t give you an exact figure off the top of my head, but I know it’s around $100.”

Put your heads together

Use this idiom when you want to encourage people to collaborate, work together, or brainstorm ideas in order to solve a problem or come up with a solution.

Example: “Let’s put our heads together and find a creative way to tackle this challenge.”

Get it into your head

Use this idiom when you want to emphasize the importance of someone understanding or realizing something.

Example: “I’ve told you multiple times, but you still don’t get it into your head that you need to study for the exam.”

Head start

Use this idiom when you want to describe an advantage or lead in a competition or situation.

Example: “He had a head start in the race, giving him an early advantage over the other runners.”

Keep a level head

Use this idiom when you want to encourage someone to remain calm, composed, and rational, especially in stressful or challenging situations.

Example: “During negotiations, it’s important to keep a level head and not let emotions cloud your judgment.”

Head honcho

Use this idiom when you want to describe the person in charge or the leader of a group or organization.

Example: “The CEO is the head honcho of the company, making major decisions and setting the direction.”

Head in the sand

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who is avoiding or ignoring a problem or reality, often by pretending it doesn’t exist.

Example: “He can’t keep his head in the sand forever; he needs to face the truth and deal with the consequences.”

Banging your head against a brick wall

Use this idiom when you want to describe trying repeatedly and unsuccessfully to achieve something or solve a problem.

Example: “I’ve been banging my head against a brick wall, trying to get him to listen, but he refuses to understand.”

Keep your head down

Use this idiom when you want to advise someone to stay focused, work diligently, and avoid attracting attention or getting involved in unnecessary conflicts.

Example: “To succeed in your job, keep your head down, focus on your tasks, and deliver quality work.”

English idioms related to the body part “eye”

Keep an eye on

Use this idiom when you want to describe the act of watching or monitoring someone or something closely.

Example: “Could you please keep an eye on my bag while I go to the restroom?”

Catch someone’s eye

Use this idiom when you want to describe attracting someone’s attention or being noticed by them.

Example: “The vibrant colors of her painting caught the eye of everyone in the art gallery.”

See eye to eye

Use this idiom when you want to describe two or more people who agree on a particular matter or have the same opinion.

Example: “Although they have different personalities, they see eye to eye on most political issues.”

Turn a blind eye

Use this idiom when you want to describe deliberately ignoring or pretending not to notice something, often to avoid dealing with it.

Example: “The teacher turned a blind eye to the students’ whispering during the exam.”

Have an eye for

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who has a talent or ability to recognize or appreciate something, often in terms of aesthetics or quality.

Example: “She has an eye for interior design; every room she decorates looks beautiful.”

Be the apple of someone’s eye

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who is cherished, loved, or favored by someone else, often a parent or guardian.

Example: “The youngest child was the apple of their parents’ eyes, receiving constant attention and affection.”

Feast your eyes on

Use this idiom when you want to describe seeing or experiencing something visually stunning or delightful.

Example: “When they entered the art museum, they feasted their eyes on a collection of breathtaking masterpieces.”

In the blink of an eye

Use this idiom when you want to describe something happening extremely quickly or instantaneously.

Example: “The thief snatched the purse in the blink of an eye and disappeared into the crowd.”

Have eyes in the back of your head

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who seems to be aware of everything happening around them, as if they have an extra sense of perception.

Example: “She always knows what’s going on; it’s like she has eyes in the back of her head.”

Be all eyes

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who is completely focused, attentive, and eager to see or observe something.

Example: “The children were all eyes as they watched the magician perform his tricks.”

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder

Use this idiom when you want to emphasize that people have different opinions or perceptions of what is beautiful or attractive.

Example: “Not everyone appreciates abstract art; beauty is in the eye of the beholder.”

Cast an eye

Use this idiom when you want to describe quickly or briefly looking at something.

Example: “She cast an eye over the report to make sure everything was in order.”

Have your eye on

Use this idiom when you want to describe having a strong interest in or desire for something or someone.

Example: “Ever since he saw the car in the showroom, he has had his eye on it and dreams of owning it.”

Keep an eye out

Use this idiom when you want to describe being vigilant or watchful for something specific.

Example: “Keep an eye out for the delivery truck; it should be arriving soon.”

In the public eye

Use this idiom when you want to describe being the focus of public attention or scrutiny.

Example: “As a celebrity, she lives her life in the public eye and must be mindful of her actions.”

English idioms related to the body part “ear”

Turn a deaf ear

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone intentionally ignoring or not paying attention to something, often to avoid dealing with it.

Example: “Despite the complaints, the manager turned a deaf ear to the employees’ concerns.”

Bend someone’s ear

Use this idiom when you want to describe talking to someone at length or in a persistent manner, often about a specific topic.

Example: “He bent my ear for hours, telling me every detail of his recent trip.”

All ears

Use this idiom when you want to convey being fully attentive, eager, and ready to listen to what someone has to say.

Example: “I’m all ears; go ahead and tell me your exciting news!”

Play it by ear

Use this idiom when you want to describe not having a fixed plan or course of action and instead deciding or adapting spontaneously based on the circumstances.

Example: “We’ll see how the weather turns out and play it by ear regarding our outdoor activity.”

Go in one ear and out the other

Use this idiom when you want to describe something being quickly forgotten or not retained after being heard.

Example: “I explained the instructions to him, but it seems like they went in one ear and out the other.”

Lend an ear

Use this idiom when you want to describe listening attentively to someone, often in a supportive or empathetic manner.

Example: “She’s always there to lend an ear and provide a listening ear when I need to talk.”

Have a tin ear

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who lacks the ability to understand or appreciate music or sounds.

Example: “Despite his love for music, he unfortunately has a tin ear and can’t carry a tune.”

Keep an ear to the ground

Use this idiom when you want to describe being attentive and aware of the current situation or developments, often to stay informed or prepared.

Example: “As a journalist, it’s important to keep an ear to the ground and be aware of any breaking news.”

Whisper something in someone’s ear

Use this idiom when you want to describe sharing a secret or private information with someone in a discreet or confidential manner.

Example: “She whispered the surprise party details in his ear so that nobody else would overhear.”

Can’t believe your ears

Use this idiom when you want to describe being surprised or incredulous about something you hear.

Example: “When they announced his promotion, he couldn’t believe his ears; he was thrilled!”

Have an ear for

Use this idiom when you want to describe having a talent or ability to recognize or appreciate sounds, music, or languages.

Example: “She has a great ear for languages; she can easily pick up accents and mimic them.”

Be up to your ears

Use this idiom when you want to describe being extremely busy or deeply involved in something.

Example: “With all the projects I’m working on, I’m up to my ears in work right now.”

Be all ears and eyes

Use this idiom when you want to convey being fully attentive and observant, ready to listen and watch intently.

Example: “During the lecture, I was all ears and eyes, absorbing every detail the professor shared.”

Fall on deaf ears

Use this idiom when you want to describe something, such as advice or a request, being ignored or not taken seriously by others.

Example: “I tried to warn her about the potential risks, but my words fell on deaf ears.”

Have an earworm

Use this idiom when you want to describe having a song or tune stuck in your head, repeating continuously.

Example: “That catchy jingle is an earworm; I can’t get it out of my head!”

English idioms related to the body part “nose”

Follow your nose

Use this idiom when you want to encourage someone to rely on their instincts or intuition to guide them in a particular situation or to find their way.

Example: “If you’re lost in the city, just follow your nose; it will lead you to the bustling marketplace.”

Keep your nose clean

Use this idiom when you want to advise someone to stay out of trouble, avoid engaging in illegal or dishonest activities, and maintain a good reputation.

Example: “He’s been in trouble before, but lately, he’s been keeping his nose clean and staying away from any questionable activities.”

Stick your nose into

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone interfering in or getting involved in someone else’s business or affairs without being invited or necessary.

Example: “She always sticks her nose into other people’s personal lives; it’s quite annoying.”

Keep your nose to the grindstone

Use this idiom when you want to encourage someone to work diligently and stay focused on their tasks or responsibilities.

Example: “We have a deadline to meet, so let’s keep our noses to the grindstone and get the project completed on time.”

Thumb your nose at

Use this idiom when you want to describe an act of defiance or showing contempt towards someone or something.

Example: “He thumbed his nose at authority by refusing to follow the rules.”

Get up someone’s nose

Use this idiom when you want to describe irritating or annoying someone, often by your actions or behavior.

Example: “Her constant complaints and demands really get up my nose; it’s hard to be around her.”

Lead someone by the nose

Use this idiom when you want to describe exerting control or dominance over someone, often manipulating or influencing their actions or decisions.

Example: “The boss had him completely under his control, leading him by the nose and making him do whatever he wanted.”

Brown-nose

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who excessively flatters or tries to gain favor with someone in a position of authority.

Example: “He’s always brown-nosing the boss, hoping for a promotion.”

Cut off your nose to spite your face

Use this idiom when you want to describe making a self-destructive or counterproductive decision or action out of stubbornness or revenge.

Example: “She canceled the vacation because she didn’t want her ex-husband to enjoy it, but in doing so, she cut off her nose to spite her face.”

Keep your nose out of

Use this idiom when you want to advise someone to avoid meddling or interfering in a situation that does not concern them.

Example: “This is a private matter; I suggest you keep your nose out of it.”

Nose around

Use this idiom when you want to describe snooping or searching in a nosy or intrusive manner.

Example: “I saw her nosing around my desk when I was away; I wonder what she was looking for.”

Have your nose in a book

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who frequently reads or is engrossed in reading.

Example: “She always has her nose in a book; she’s a true bookworm.”

Look down your nose at

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone showing a sense of superiority or disdain towards others.

Example: “He always looks down his nose at people who don’t share his interests or lifestyle.”

Under your nose

Use this idiom when you want to describe something happening or existing very close to you, but you fail to notice or recognize it.

Example: “The keys were under your nose the whole time; they were on the table in front of you.”

Cut off your nose

Use this idiom when you want to describe making a hasty or irrational decision that has negative consequences.

Example: “He cut off his nose by quitting his stable job without having another one lined up.”

English idioms related to the body part “hair”

Let your hair down

Use this idiom when you want to encourage someone to relax, be themselves, and enjoy themselves without inhibition or restraint.

Example: “After a long week of work, she decided to let her hair down and have a fun night out with her friends.”

Bad hair day

Use this idiom when you want to describe a day when your hair looks untidy, messy, or generally unattractive.

Example: “I woke up late and didn’t have time to fix my hair, so it’s definitely a bad hair day for me.”

Split hairs

Use this idiom when you want to describe arguing or nitpicking over trivial or insignificant details.

Example: “We don’t need to split hairs over the exact wording; let’s focus on the main point of the discussion.”

Hair-raising

Use this idiom when you want to describe something that is thrilling, exciting, or causing great fear or alarm.

Example: “The roller coaster ride was absolutely hair-raising; it had steep drops and sharp turns.”

Keep your hair on

Use this idiom when you want to tell someone to remain calm and not to overreact or get upset.

Example: “Don’t panic; keep your hair on and let’s figure out a solution to the problem.”

Hair of the dog

Use this idiom when you want to describe having a small amount of alcohol, usually in the morning, to cure a hangover.

Example: “After a night of heavy drinking, he had a hair of the dog to ease his hangover.”

Make your hair stand on end

Use this idiom when you want to describe something that is extremely shocking, horrifying, or frightening.

Example: “The sudden scream in the haunted house made my hair stand on end.”

Tear your hair out

Use this idiom when you want to describe feeling extremely frustrated, anxious, or stressed about a situation or problem.

Example: “I’ve been trying to fix this computer issue for hours; it’s making me tear my hair out!”

Keep your hair on straight

Use this idiom when you want to advise someone to stay focused, composed, and level-headed, especially in challenging or stressful situations.

Example: “In a high-pressure job, it’s important to keep your hair on straight and make rational decisions.”

Hair’s breadth

Use this idiom when you want to describe an extremely close or narrow margin or distance.

Example: “He missed the bus by a hair’s breadth; he arrived at the stop just as it was pulling away.”

Pull your hair out

Use this idiom when you want to describe feeling frustrated, exasperated, or overwhelmed by a problem or situation.

Example: “I’ve been trying to solve this math problem for hours, and it’s making me want to pull my hair out!”

Hair’s breadth escape

Use this idiom when you want to describe a narrow escape or close call, often from a dangerous or risky situation.

Example: “The car swerved just in time to avoid a collision; it was a hair’s breadth escape.”

Hair-trigger temper

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who becomes angry or reacts quickly and easily to even slight provocations.

Example: “He has a hair-trigger temper; it doesn’t take much to set him off.”

English idioms related to the body part “mouth”

Put your money where your mouth is

Use this idiom when you want to challenge someone to back up their words or promises with concrete actions or financial commitment.

Example: “If you think you can do a better job, then put your money where your mouth is and show us.”

Shoot your mouth off

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone speaking impulsively, recklessly, or without thinking, often leading to unintended consequences.

Example: “He tends to shoot his mouth off without considering the impact of his words on others.”

Loudmouth

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who talks too much, often loudly or in an obnoxious manner.

Example: “He’s such a loudmouth; he never stops talking and always dominates the conversation.”

Keep your mouth shut

Use this idiom when you want to advise someone to remain silent or not to reveal information that could be detrimental or inappropriate.

Example: “I trust you with this secret, but you need to keep your mouth shut and not tell anyone.”

Have a sweet tooth

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who has a strong liking or craving for sweet foods or desserts.

Example: “She has a real sweet tooth; she can’t resist a slice of cake or a scoop of ice cream.”

Mouth-watering

Use this idiom when you want to describe something that looks or smells extremely delicious and makes you anticipate eating it.

Example: “The aroma from the bakery was mouth-watering; I couldn’t resist buying a freshly baked croissant.”

Born with a silver spoon in your mouth

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who comes from a wealthy or privileged background.

Example: “He was born with a silver spoon in his mouth; he has never had to worry about financial struggles.”

Keep your mouth watered

Use this idiom when you want to describe continuously anticipating or desiring something.

Example: “The advertisements for the new gadget kept their mouths watered; they couldn’t wait to get their hands on it.”

Foot-in-mouth

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone saying something inappropriate, embarrassing, or tactless without intending to.

Example: “He often puts his foot in his mouth by making thoughtless comments that offend others.”

All mouth and no action

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who talks a lot or makes big promises but fails to take action or follow through.

Example: “He’s all mouth and no action; he talks a big game but never delivers on his promises.”

Watch your mouth

Use this idiom when you want to caution someone to be mindful of their words, especially if they are being disrespectful or offensive.

Example: “Watch your mouth and show some respect when you speak to your elders.”

The cat got your tongue

Use this idiom when you want to ask someone why they are not speaking or why they are suddenly silent.

Example: “You usually have plenty to say; why are you so quiet? Has the cat got your tongue?”

Bite your tongue

Use this idiom when you want to advise someone to refrain from speaking or expressing their opinion, especially if it could be hurtful or inappropriate.

Example: “I had to bite my tongue during the meeting to avoid arguing with my colleague.”

A taste of your own medicine

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone experiencing the same negative treatment or behavior that they have inflicted on others.

Example: “After years of being rude to his coworkers, he finally got a taste of his own medicine when they started ignoring him.”

Run your mouth

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone talking excessively, often about trivial or unimportant matters.

Example: “He loves to run his mouth about gossip and rumors, but rarely says anything of substance.”

English idioms related to the body part “shoulders”

Carry the weight of the world on your shoulders

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone feeling burdened or overwhelmed by a heavy responsibility or numerous challenges.

Example: “After his parents’ passing, he felt like he was carrying the weight of the world on his shoulders, taking care of his younger siblings.”

Stand on someone’s shoulders

Use this idiom when you want to acknowledge or recognize the accomplishments, achievements, or contributions of those who came before you.

Example: “I owe my success to the pioneers in my field who stood on their shoulders and paved the way for new discoveries.”

Put your shoulder to the wheel

Use this idiom when you want to encourage someone to work hard, put in a concerted effort, and contribute their best to achieve a goal.

Example: “We need to put our shoulder to the wheel if we want to meet the project deadline.”

Shoulder the blame

Use this idiom when you want to describe taking responsibility or accepting the blame for something, even if it wasn’t entirely your fault.

Example: “As the team leader, he shoulders the blame for the project’s failure, even though multiple factors contributed to it.”

Cry on someone’s shoulder

Use this idiom when you want to describe seeking comfort, solace, or emotional support from someone during times of distress or sadness.

Example: “After a long day, she needed to cry on her best friend’s shoulder and share her frustrations.”

Give someone the cold shoulder

Use this idiom when you want to describe intentionally ignoring or being distant towards someone as a form of disapproval or indifference.

Example: “She was upset with her colleague, so she gave him the cold shoulder at the office party.”

Chip on your shoulder

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone harboring a grudge or having a persistent sense of resentment or defensiveness.

Example: “He always has a chip on his shoulder and is ready to argue with anyone who disagrees with him.”

Shoulder to cry on

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who provides emotional support, empathy, or a listening ear during difficult times.

Example: “When she went through a breakup, her best friend was always there as a shoulder to cry on.”

Have broad shoulders

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who is emotionally strong and able to handle challenges, criticism, or pressure without being easily affected.

Example: “He has broad shoulders; he doesn’t let negative comments or setbacks discourage him.”

English idioms related to the body part “stomach”

Have a gut feeling

Use this idiom when you want to describe a strong intuition or instinct about something, even without logical evidence or reasoning.

Example: “I can’t explain it, but I have a gut feeling that something good is going to happen today.”

Butterflies in your stomach

Use this idiom when you want to describe feeling nervous or anxious, often due to anticipation or excitement.

Example: “Before going on stage, she always gets butterflies in her stomach.”

Have a strong stomach

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who can tolerate or handle unpleasant or disturbing situations without feeling nauseous or upset.

Example: “Working as a surgeon requires having a strong stomach to deal with the sight of blood and medical procedures.”

Stomach something

Use this idiom when you want to describe enduring or tolerating something difficult, unpleasant, or challenging.

Example: “She had to stomach the criticism and continue working on improving her skills.”

Turn your stomach

Use this idiom when you want to describe something that causes a feeling of disgust or revulsion.

Example: “The sight of raw meat turns my stomach; I can’t handle it.”

A hollow stomach

Use this idiom when you want to describe being hungry or having an empty feeling in your stomach due to not having eaten.

Example: “After skipping breakfast, I had a hollow stomach by mid-morning.”

Stick to your stomach

Use this idiom when you want to describe feeling physically uncomfortable or queasy after eating something heavy or unpleasant.

Example: “The greasy fast-food meal stuck to my stomach and made me feel sick.”

Have eyes bigger than your stomach

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who takes more food than they can actually eat.

Example: “She filled her plate with so much food, but soon realized she had eyes bigger than her stomach.”

Listen to your stomach

Use this idiom when you want to emphasize the importance of paying attention to your body’s hunger or fullness cues.

Example: “Instead of finishing everything on your plate, listen to your stomach and stop eating when you’re satisfied.”

Sick to your stomach

Use this idiom when you want to describe feeling nauseated or experiencing digestive discomfort.

Example: “The news made her sick to her stomach; she couldn’t eat for hours.”

Digestible

Use this idiom when you want to describe something that is easily understandable or comprehensible.

Example: “The article was written in a clear and digestible manner, making it accessible to readers of all backgrounds.”

Fill your stomach

Use this idiom when you want to describe eating enough food to satisfy your hunger.

Example: “After a long day, he wanted to fill his stomach with a hearty meal.”

English idioms related to the body part “face”

Save face

Use this idiom when you want to describe preserving one’s dignity, reputation, or public image, especially in a difficult or embarrassing situation.

Example: “He apologized to his colleague to save face after making a mistake during the presentation.”

Lose face

Use this idiom when you want to describe experiencing a loss of respect, credibility, or reputation due to a mistake or failure.

Example: “The company’s unethical practices caused them to lose face in the eyes of their customers.”

Face the music

Use this idiom when you want to describe accepting the consequences or taking responsibility for one’s actions, often in a challenging or difficult situation.

Example: “He knew he had to face the music and apologize for his behavior at the meeting.”

Keep a straight face

Use this idiom when you want to describe maintaining a serious or composed expression, especially when faced with something humorous or absurd.

Example: “Even though the joke was hilarious, she managed to keep a straight face during the entire performance.”

Put on a brave face

Use this idiom when you want to describe appearing confident and optimistic, despite feeling scared, worried, or uncertain.

Example: “She put on a brave face and went on stage to deliver her speech, despite her stage fright.”

Face value

Use this idiom when you want to describe accepting something as it appears or is presented, without questioning or analyzing it further.

Example: “He took the advertisement at face value and didn’t consider any hidden costs or conditions.”

Face the facts

Use this idiom when you want to describe accepting or acknowledging the reality or truth of a situation, even if it is difficult or unpleasant.

Example: “It’s time to face the facts and admit that the project is not going as planned.”

Face the consequences

Use this idiom when you want to describe accepting and dealing with the negative outcomes or results of one’s actions.

Example: “He knew he had made a mistake and was ready to face the consequences of his actions.”

Put a brave face on

Use this idiom when you want to describe making an effort to appear brave, confident, or unaffected, even if feeling scared or vulnerable.

Example: “Despite her disappointment, she put a brave face on and congratulated her friend on the promotion.”

Face the firing squad

Use this idiom when you want to describe facing a group of people who criticize or confront you about something you have done wrong.

Example: “When the news of the scandal broke, he had to face the firing squad of journalists and answer their tough questions.”

In your face

Use this idiom when you want to describe something that is direct, confrontational, or done openly and boldly.

Example: “Her criticism was right in your face; she didn’t hold back in expressing her disapproval.”

Poker face

Use this idiom when you want to describe a facial expression that does not reveal one’s thoughts or emotions, especially in a game or situation where bluffing or hiding one’s intentions is important.

Example: “He had a perfect poker face, making it difficult to tell whether he had a good hand or was bluffing.”

English idioms related to the body part “neck”

Stick your neck out

Use this idiom when you want to describe taking a risk or making oneself vulnerable by expressing an opinion, taking a stand, or making a decision.

Example: “He stuck his neck out by investing his savings in the startup, hoping for its success.”

Neck and neck

Use this idiom when you want to describe a close competition or race, where two or more participants are equally matched.

Example: “The two runners were neck and neck as they sprinted towards the finish line.”

Neck of the woods

Use this idiom when you want to refer to a specific area, neighborhood, or region.

Example: “I grew up in a small town in the southern neck of the woods.”

Breathe down someone’s neck

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone closely monitoring or watching another person’s actions, often causing pressure or discomfort.

Example: “The boss is constantly breathing down my neck, checking on my progress every hour.”

Break your neck

Use this idiom when you want to describe putting in a great amount of effort, working very hard, or moving quickly to accomplish something.

Example: “I had to break my neck to finish the project before the deadline.”

Pain in the neck

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone or something that is annoying, bothersome, or causing trouble.

Example: “Dealing with all the paperwork is such a pain in the neck; it takes up so much time.”

Stiff-necked

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who is stubborn, inflexible, or resistant to change.

Example: “He’s a stiff-necked individual who refuses to consider alternative viewpoints.”

Get it in the neck

Use this idiom when you want to describe being reprimanded, criticized, or punished for something.

Example: “He got it in the neck from his boss for missing the important deadline.”

Up to your neck

Use this idiom when you want to describe being fully occupied, overwhelmed, or deeply involved in a situation.

Example: “With all the assignments, I’m up to my neck in work; I don’t have time for anything else.”

Save your own neck

Use this idiom when you want to describe taking action to protect oneself or ensure one’s own safety or well-being.

Example: “In the face of danger, his instinct was to save his own neck and escape.”

Keep your neck above water

Use this idiom when you want to describe managing to stay out of trouble, avoid drowning in difficulties, or maintain a satisfactory level of progress despite challenges.

Example: “With careful budgeting, she managed to keep her neck above water during the financial crisis.”

English idioms related to the body part “knee”

Bring someone to their knees

Use this idiom when you want to describe causing someone to be in a weakened or vulnerable position, often through a challenging or difficult situation.

Example: “The loss of her loved ones brought her to her knees; she was devastated.”

Weak at the knees

Use this idiom when you want to describe feeling physically or emotionally weak, often due to excitement, fear, or admiration.

Example: “When she saw her favorite celebrity, her knees went weak, and she could hardly speak.”

The bee’s knees

Use this idiom when you want to describe something or someone excellent, outstanding, or of high quality.

Example: “The new restaurant’s desserts are the bee’s knees; they are absolutely delicious.”

Down on your knees

Use this idiom when you want to describe being in a humble or subservient position, often through prayer or supplication.

Example: “He went down on his knees to propose marriage to his partner.”

Knee-jerk reaction

Use this idiom when you want to describe an immediate or instinctive response without careful thought or consideration.

Example: “Instead of analyzing the situation, he had a knee-jerk reaction and made a hasty decision.”

Get down on your knees

Use this idiom when you want to describe an act of humility, submission, or pleading.

Example: “He got down on his knees and begged for forgiveness.”

Falls on bended knee

Use this idiom when you want to describe a romantic gesture of proposing marriage while kneeling down.

Example: “He planned a romantic proposal and asked her to marry him on bended knee.”

Take a knee

Use this idiom when you want to describe the act of kneeling, often as a sign of respect, solidarity, or protest.

Example: “During the protest, they decided to take a knee to show their support for the cause.”

On bended knee

Use this idiom when you want to describe an act of submission, pleading, or supplication, often with one knee touching the ground.

Example: “He proposed to her on bended knee, professing his love and asking for her hand in marriage.”

English idioms related to the body part “foot”

Put your best foot forward

Use this idiom when you want to encourage someone to make a good impression, give their best effort, or showcase their skills and abilities.

Example: “Before the job interview, she reminded herself to put her best foot forward and present herself confidently.”

Shoot yourself in the foot

Use this idiom when you want to describe unintentionally causing harm or sabotaging your own efforts or chances of success.

Example: “By revealing confidential information, he shot himself in the foot and lost the trust of his colleagues.”

Get off on the right foot

Use this idiom when you want to describe starting something in a positive or favorable way, often by making a good first impression.

Example: “To get off on the right foot with the new team, she organized a team-building activity.”

Drag your feet

Use this idiom when you want to describe delaying or procrastinating, being slow to act, or showing reluctance to move forward.

Example: “He dragged his feet in completing the project, causing delays in the overall timeline.”

Get cold feet

Use this idiom when you want to describe feeling nervous, anxious, or hesitant about a decision or undertaking, often resulting in a change of plans or backing out.

Example: “On the day of the performance, he got cold feet and decided not to go on stage.”

On the right foot

Use this idiom when you want to describe starting something in a positive or successful manner.

Example: “The project started on the right foot with a strong team and clear goals.”

Put your foot in your mouth

Use this idiom when you want to describe saying something inappropriate, embarrassing, or tactless, usually unintentionally.

Example: “He put his foot in his mouth by making a thoughtless comment about her appearance.”

Swept off your feet

Use this idiom when you want to describe being overwhelmed or captivated by strong emotions, often in a romantic context.

Example: “She was swept off her feet by his romantic gestures and charming personality.”

Start off on the wrong foot

Use this idiom when you want to describe starting something in a negative or unfavorable way, often leading to difficulties or misunderstandings.

Example: “Due to a misunderstanding, they started off on the wrong foot and had a strained relationship from the beginning.”

Get back on your feet

Use this idiom when you want to describe recovering from a setback, difficult situation, or illness and returning to a normal or successful state.

Example: “After losing his job, he took some time to regroup and eventually got back on his feet with a new career opportunity.”

Have one foot in the grave

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who is very old, frail, or in poor health, often implying their imminent death.

Example: “At 98 years old, he’s lived a long life, and some would say he has one foot in the grave.”

Light on your feet

Use this idiom when you want to describe someone who is agile, nimble, or moves with grace and ease.

Example: “As a dancer, she is light on her feet and can perform intricate routines with precision.”

English idioms related to the body part “hand”

Give someone a hand

Use this idiom when you want to offer help or assistance to someone.

Example: “He was struggling with his luggage, so I gave him a hand and helped carry it up the stairs.”

On the one hand… on the other hand

Use this idiom when you want to present two contrasting points of view or perspectives on a situation.

Example: “On the one hand, studying abroad can be an enriching experience. On the other hand, it can be expensive.”

Have the upper hand

Use this idiom when you want to describe having an advantage or being in control in a situation or relationship.

Example: “After winning the first two rounds, she had the upper hand in the tennis match.”

Wash your hands of

Use this idiom when you want to describe distancing yourself from a responsibility or problem and refusing to be involved any further.

Example: “After repeatedly offering help, he washed his hands of the situation and let them handle it on their own.”

Get your hands dirty

Use this idiom when you want to describe actively engaging in physical work or getting involved in a challenging or difficult task.

Example: “As a CEO, she isn’t afraid to get her hands dirty and work alongside her employees.”

Have a hand in

Use this idiom when you want to describe being involved in or having influence over a particular situation or outcome.

Example: “She had a hand in the company’s success by developing innovative marketing strategies.”

Work hand in hand

Use this idiom when you want to describe close collaboration or cooperation between people or entities.

Example: “The marketing and sales teams work hand in hand to achieve the company’s revenue targets.”

Bite the hand that feeds you

Use this idiom when you want to describe betraying or harming someone who has helped or supported you.

Example: “After receiving generous financial assistance, he bit the hand that fed him by spreading false rumors.”

Raise your hand

Use this idiom when you want to encourage someone to indicate their agreement, participation, or desire to speak in a group setting.

Example: “If you have any questions, please raise your hand, and I will address them.”

Tie someone’s hands

Use this idiom when you want to describe restricting or preventing someone from taking action or making decisions.

Example: “The strict regulations tied his hands, making it difficult for him to implement the necessary changes.”

Hand in hand

Use this idiom when you want to describe two things or concepts that are closely connected or occur simultaneously.

Example: “Happiness and success often go hand in hand; when you’re happy, you’re more likely to achieve success.”

Play into someone’s hands

Use this idiom when you want to describe unintentionally helping someone achieve their goals or giving them an advantage.

Example: “By reacting angrily, he played into her hands and gave her the satisfaction of getting a rise out of him.”

Conclusion

Understanding idiomatic expressions is a significant step towards language proficiency. Body part idioms, in particular, offer a fun and memorable way to expand your vocabulary and enhance your ability to express complex ideas or emotions. Although these expressions may seem strange at first, they are a vital component of natural language use. By learning and practicing these idioms, you will be better equipped to understand and engage in authentic English conversations. Remember, language learning is a journey, and every step, no matter how small, brings you closer to your goal.

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