Idioms Intermediate | Anger

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Welcome to a new episode from English plus podcast. Today, we’re going to talk about idioms and today is the series idioms, intermediate. We’re going to talk about ATM’s that we use to describe anger. And we have many idioms that we can use to describe anger in English. But before we start with our episode, let me remind you that you can find the transcript of this episode in a link.

[00:00:30] I will leave in the description and you will also find two other links in the description. One that takes you to Patreon, where you can decide to become a patron of English plus podcasts and support us. And by doing that, you will get PDF practice worksheets custom made. For every single episode we create.

[00:00:48] And the other link will take you to our mailing list, where you can subscribe to our mailing list and get updates on our schedule every two weeks with selected premium PDF practice worksheets for our mailing list subscribers. Now that being said, let’s start talking about being angry. So today is about ATM’s that describe anger and being angry.

[00:01:12] So let’s start right away with our first example. And from this example, we will see the first ATM. We will learn to describe being angry in English, but in ado, medic language, I’m fed up with trying to live on such a small wage, or you can say I’m fed up to the back teeth. With trying to live on such a small wage.

[00:01:35] Obviously the ADM is fed up with or fed up to the back teeth with, what does that mean? Now, if you say that you’re fed up to the back teeth with something, or in the same sense, you can say sick to the back teeth of something that means you’re annoyed or tired because something has been happening for a long time and you think it should be stopped or changed.

[00:01:58] So that is our first idiom that describes being angry, fed up with, or fit up to the back teeth with. And now let’s move on to the next example. I’m at my wits end, trying to keep things in order. So the EDM here is at my wit’s end. I’m at my wits end, trying to keep things in order. What does that mean when you are at your wit’s end?

[00:02:22] That means you’re very worried and desperate about something and not knowing what to do about it. You don’t know what to do. You can’t think of new solutions or other ways to try and solve the problem that you have or the problems that you have. So you’re at your wits end. So that is another idiom. Now let’s move on to talk about another one.

[00:02:44] I’ve had it up to here with this organization. So the EDM is habit up to here. Now I’ve had it up to here with this organization. That means I can’t stand it anymore. I’m angry. I can’t stand it anymore. I’ve had it up to here and now the next one, your boss will have a fit when he finds out, you forgot to reply to those letters.

[00:03:06] Or we can say he will throw a fit. When he finds out, you forgot to reply to those letters. So obviously he will get angry. If you say that someone will have a fit when they hear about something, you mean that they will be very angry or shocked. So that is to have, or throw a fit. That is another EDM we can use to describe being angry, but that’s not all we can say in the same sense instead of have a fit or throw a fit, we can say go off the deep end.

[00:03:37] Go spare. Do his not or blow a fuse. So all of these have exactly the same meaning go off the deep end, go spare, do his nut or blow a fuse. So for example, we can say your boss will blow a fuse when he knows that you haven’t replied to those letters. And now let’s move on to other examples using blood in them.

[00:03:59] If someone’s blood is up, they are very angry and may react in a violent way. That’s when we say his blood is up, you have no idea how he’s going to react because he’s very angry and he might react in a violent way. So stay out of his way and try to calm him down. His blood is up. And we can also say if you’re after someone’s blood, somebody can be after someone’s blood.

[00:04:25] And that means you want to catch them in order to hurt or punish them. Uh, he’s after my blood, after he learned that I tricked him last time in the card game, for example, he’s after my blood, he’s very angry. He wants to catch me to punish me or to hurt me. So after someone’s blood, if you are after or anybody’s after someone’s blood, that means this person wants to catch the other person in order to hurt or punish them.

[00:04:51] But that’s not everything about blood. If you are out for blood, you are determined to find someone to attack or blame for something bad that has happened. So when someone is angry and they want to find someone to blame or to attack, that means they’re out for blood. Also stay out of their way and try to calm them down because they can do a lot of damage.

[00:05:15] And now let’s talk about idioms that describe angry relationships. Now let’s start with this first example. The neighbor’s loud music every night is driving me up the wall. So obviously the ADM here is to drive someone up the wall. What does that mean? That means to make someone very angry or sometimes we can use it to mean very bored, but here, obviously we’re talking about anger.

[00:05:41] So to make someone very angry, to drive someone up the wall now for the next example, his lack of consideration is driving me round the twist. His lack of consideration is driving me round the twist. So here the idiom is to drive or to send someone round the twist or round the bend. We can say the bend as well here.

[00:06:03] And what does that mean also to make someone very angry? Or again, sometimes very bored. And now we have three idioms here. That mean the same thing to make someone annoyed. Let’s take a look at the first example. Jill always manages to say something to Rob her father up the wrong way. So what is the EDM rubbed someone up the wrong way?

[00:06:26] And that means to make him annoyed. And the second example, Roger, put his sister’s back up by saying she would never be a good driver. So what is the EDM here? Put someone’s back up. So here we said, Roger, put his sister’s back up by saying she would never be a good driver. We can say by the way, get someone’s backup.

[00:06:49] And here, I want you to pay close attention to a very important thing you need to know about when we talk about idioms. And that is ATM’s are almost always fixed expression. So you can change parts of it. Like when we say. Here, put someone’s back up. Of course, this, someone can be a name can be a person, or it can be my sister, my father, whatever you say, you can change someone here of course, but you can change the form of the other words.

[00:07:16] Yes. We said you can say, get or put that’s fine, but you can say, put someone back up without the apostrophe S you have to put the apostrophe, as you can say back. Off for example, you can change the preposition. It doesn’t work this way. Idioms are fixed expressions. You have to learn them as they are, because that’s the only way they can be used.

[00:07:36] Otherwise they’re not ATM’s and they might have other meanings and they might be just wrong. And now let’s move on to the third example I told you about that mean the same thing. Make someone annoyed. Joe says what she thinks without worrying about whether she might be ruffling anyone’s feathers. Now, here are the EDM is to ruffle someone’s feathers, ruffled someone’s feathers.

[00:07:57] Of course, in this case, ruffle anyone’s feathers because that’s in general. She doesn’t worry about this. She doesn’t care if she ruffles anybody’s feathers. So now we will move on to talk about other EDM still we’re talking about angry relationships. Now, then he put the cat among the pigeons by suggesting that the company might have to make some redundancies.

[00:08:18] Here. What did Danny do? It’s not me, actually. It’s just an example. He put the cat among the pigeon. Now we can say, put the cat among the pigeons, or we can say, send the cat among the pigeons. Both are fine. What does that mean? That means to do or say something that makes a lot of people angry or worried.

[00:08:37] So here, then he put the cat among the pigeons by suggesting that the company might have to make some redundancies, might fire some people that made a lot of people angry or worried. Now, for another example, they haven’t been on speaking terms for years, although neither can remember what they first quarreled about.

[00:08:56] They don’t talk to each other. They are so angry with each other that they refuse to speak to each other. What’s the ADM here. They are not on speaking terms, not be on speaking terms. They haven’t been on speaking terms. So here again, since we talked about fixed expressions and what we can change and what we can change in idioms, of course, when we say not be on speaking terms, that’s the idiom.

[00:09:20] Of course it can be in any tense. They haven’t been, they are not. They are not going to be whatever you want. You can change the tense, obviously here, but you can change. For example, on, you can say they haven’t been in, or at speaking terms, it’s wrong. You have to use the preposition on. So not be on speaking terms.

[00:09:41] And now for our next example, the old lady gave the children an earful for nearly knocking her over. So what is the EDM here? Give someone an earful. Give someone an earful. What does that mean? That means to tell someone how angry you are with them. And now for our last example, for this episode, he’ll give the boys a piece of his mind if he catches them in his garden.

[00:10:07] Now to give someone a piece of your mind means to tell someone how angry you are with them. So that was the last idiom I wanted to tell you about today. And these are the idioms that we can use to describe anger in English being angry or angry relationships among other things we talked about in this episode, I hope you enjoyed the episode and learn some new ways to describe how angry you may be or how angry other people.

[00:10:32] You may be very calm. You may be very happy, not angry at all, and that’s good for you. But if you want to describe anger, you have these idioms that you can use. Now before I leave, let me remind you that you can find the transcript of this episode in a link. I will leave in the description and you will also find a link to Patreon where you can go there and become a patron of English plus podcasts and support our podcasts.

[00:10:55] And by doing that, you will get a PDF practice worksheet for every single episode we create. And you will find another link that will take you to our mailing list, where you can subscribe to our mailing list and get an updated schedule every two weeks. With selected premium PDF practice worksheets that we will send to our mailing list subscribers with that being said, that’ll be all for today.

[00:11:17] This is your host, Danny. Thank you very much for listening to another episode from English plus podcast. I will see you next time.

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