Introduction

Learn about 6 brain myths and what the reality about them is in a new Let’s Talk Science episode from English Plus Podcast. We’ll learn whether our brains are objective, if we have 5 independent senses, if our brains are too smart for magic tricks, if there are super foods that can make us smarter, if we only use 10% of our brain, and if we perceive the world as it is.

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Text Transcript

Let’s Talk Science | Brain Myths 2

Danny:

Welcome to a new Let’s Talk Science episode from English Plus Podcast. Last time, we started our very first episode of Let’s Talk Science by talking about brain myths and since this topic is so interesting and since there are still many brain myths that we haven’t talked about yet, we will continue talking about brain myths today, and we will talk about six more myths in today’s episode. We will answer the following questions:

Do you only use 10% of your brain?

Do you perceive the world as it really is?

Is your brain too smart for magic tricks?

Is your brain objective?

Do you have five independent senses?

Can certain foods make you smarter?

Very exciting questions that we’re going to talk about in detail in this episode.

Don’t forget that there is a new Let’s Talk Science episode every Thursday, so stay tuned as you don’t want to miss that, and of course, there are the other Let’s Talk episodes, from topics to business, literature and myths and legends, in addition to our weekly Word Power episodes and Casual Talk episodes, so check these episodes as well. You don’t want to miss a thing.

And now without further ado, let’s start talking about the brain myths we have for today. I have Ben with me today to discuss these brain myths. How excited are you to talk about brain myths, yet again this week?

Ben:

I’m so excited by anything and everything related to the way our brain works, because I believe there are still a lot of mysteries and uncharted territories that we need to understand not about some hidden cave in the Mariana Trench or somewhere in the Himalayas; it’s right here, inside our head, and we still can’t understand everything it does, or how it does it, so yes, I’m absolutely excited about this. Let’s do it.

Alright! Let’s start with a very common myth that says people only use 10% of their brain. Some say that Einstein was much more intelligent than other people because he used like 13 or 14% of his brain. How much truth is in that, and is it a myth that we can only use 10% of our brain?

Danny:

The idea that people only use 10% of their brain is a complete myth and has no scientific basis. It is not possible to use only a certain percentage of the brain and there is no evidence to suggest that anyone, including Einstein, used more of their brain than others. In fact, all parts of the brain are constantly active and play important roles in various functions, such as movement, sensation, decision-making, and thinking. No one can use only a fraction of their brain and remain conscious, so the idea that someone could use more of their brain than others is not scientifically plausible.

Ben:

So, what’s the truth about that, or at least what do we know so far about that based on scientific research?

Danny:

There is no scientific evidence to support the idea that people only use 10% of their brain. The truth is that the entire brain is active and utilized at all times, and all parts of the brain have specific functions.

Research has shown that even when people appear to be at rest, their brain is still active and performing important functions such as regulating heart rate, breathing, and controlling eye movements. Furthermore, imaging studies such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) scans have shown that different regions of the brain become active when performing various tasks, demonstrating that the entire brain is utilized and not just a small portion.

Ben:

So it is true that we use all of our brain— and, in fact, if we don’t use a part of our brain for one function, it will get reassigned. Cortical real estate is competitive.

Danny:

Yes, that is correct! The concept of “use it or lose it” applies to the brain, and underused brain regions can have their functions taken over by other regions. This process is called neuroplasticity, and it is a well-established principle in neuroscience.

Research has shown that the brain is highly adaptable and can change its structure and function in response to experience and learning. For example, when a person loses the ability to use one limb, other regions of the brain may compensate and take over the functions previously performed by the injured limb.

Similarly, when a person learns a new skill, such as playing a musical instrument, new connections are formed in the brain and the areas responsible for movement and coordination become stronger and more active. This demonstrates that the brain is capable of adapting and changing its structure and function throughout life.

Ben:

So, why would anyone think that we only use only 10% of our brains?

Danny:

The origin of the myth that people only use 10% of their brain is unclear, but it has been around for more than a century. It is often repeated in popular culture, in movies, books, and even in advertisements for products that claim to enhance brain power.

There is no scientific evidence to support the idea that people only use 10% of their brain, and it is not clear where the idea came from or why it persists. It is possible that the myth may have been propagated as a way to explain exceptional intelligence or ability, but there is no basis in scientific fact.

Ben:

Well, that poses another important question; if we use all of our brain all of the time, how can we ever learn anything new? Is there a limit to what or how much we can learn?

Danny:

The idea that we use all of our brain all the time does not mean that there is a limit to what or how much we can learn. The brain is capable of continuously adapting and changing in response to new experiences and learning.

Research has shown that the brain has a remarkable capacity for plasticity and can reorganize and form new connections in response to learning. When a person learns a new skill or gains new knowledge, new connections are formed in the brain, and the regions responsible for that specific skill or knowledge become stronger and more active.

Furthermore, recent research has shown that the adult brain is capable of producing new neurons, a process known as neurogenesis, which further demonstrates the brain’s ability to adapt and change throughout life.

Ben:

Alright. Now let’s move on and talk about another brain myth that is related to perception. Do we perceive the world as it really is?

Danny:

No, we do not perceive the world as it really is. Our perception of the world is shaped by a combination of sensory input and our own experiences, beliefs, and expectations. This process is called perception, and it involves the interpretation of sensory information to create a meaningful experience of the world around us.

Research has shown that our perception is not a direct reflection of the world, but rather a construction created by the brain. The brain takes in sensory information from the eyes, ears, nose, tongue, and skin, and then processes this information, making decisions about what is important and what can be disregarded. This process of perception is not always accurate and can be influenced by our own experiences, beliefs, and expectations.

For example, optical illusions demonstrate that our perception can be misleading, and we can be easily tricked into seeing things that are not actually there. Similarly, research has shown that our perception can be influenced by our expectations, and we may perceive things differently based on our prior experiences and knowledge.

Ben:

So is it true that we experience the world through our senses, and that our senses only track a tiny portion of the environment? And our senses give us only a rough sketch while the brain fills in the rest?

Danny:

Yes, that is mostly true. Our senses are responsible for capturing information from the environment, but the information they provide is limited, and the brain must fill in the gaps to create a complete experience of the world.

Our senses are designed to detect specific aspects of the environment, such as light, sound, smell, taste, and touch. However, the information that our senses provide is limited, and the brain must use this information to construct a more complete and coherent experience of the world.

For example, the information that we receive from our eyes is limited by the range of light that we can see and the number of color receptors in the eye. The brain must then use this limited information to fill in gaps, such as the texture of objects, their depth and distance, and the details of their appearance.

Ben:

So based on what we said, how should we answer the following question from the perspective of a psychologist: If a tree falls in the forest and there is no one there to hear it, does it make a sound?

Danny:

From the perspective of a psychologist, the answer to the question “If a tree falls in the forest and there is no one there to hear it, does it make a sound?” is a subjective one. Sound is a subjective experience created by the brain in response to the stimulation of the auditory system. If there is no one present to hear the tree fall, then there is no auditory stimulation, and therefore, no subjective experience of sound.

In this sense, sound exists only as a perceptual experience and is not an objective property of the world. The stimulation of the auditory system, the interpretation of that stimulation by the brain, and the creation of the experience of sound are all aspects of the subjective experience of sound.

Ben:

So, what would our lives be like if we could sense a completely different set of physical stimuli?

Danny:

If we could sense a completely different set of physical stimuli, our lives would be vastly different from what they are now. Our experiences, understanding of the world, and behavior would all be shaped by the new information we were able to perceive.

For example, if we were able to perceive ultraviolet light or infrared radiation, our experience of the world would change dramatically. We might see new patterns in the world around us, or be able to understand relationships between objects and events in new ways.

Similarly, if we could sense different forms of energy, such as magnetic fields or gravitational forces, our understanding of the world would change. We might be able to experience new relationships between objects, and understand new properties of the physical world.

Ben:

Very well, let’s move on and talk about another brain myth. What about magic tricks? Are our brains too smart for magic tricks?

Danny:

No, our brains are not too smart for magic tricks. In fact, the opposite is often true. Magic tricks rely on our brains’ natural tendencies and limitations to create illusions and deceive us.

Magic tricks exploit our perceptions, attention, and expectations in clever ways. For example, a magician might direct our attention to one part of a trick while the important part of the trick happens elsewhere, or might use misdirection to guide our attention away from what is actually happening.

Our brains are naturally susceptible to these kinds of illusions because they are designed to simplify the complex and ambiguous information that we receive from our senses. This allows us to make sense of the world quickly and efficiently, but also makes us vulnerable to deception.

Ben:

So, do you believe that studying how our brains react to magic tricks is important. I mean is it true to say that illusions are present in all of our senses and can give us an idea of how the brain accomplishes the difficult task of perceiving the world?

Danny:

Yes, studying how our brains react to magic tricks can be an important way to gain insights into how the brain processes sensory information and creates perceptions of the world. Illusions in all of our senses can highlight the ways in which the brain can be misled, and give us an idea of how the brain accomplishes the difficult task of perceiving the world.

By understanding how magic tricks and illusions work, we can learn about the limitations and biases in our perceptions, and gain a deeper understanding of how the brain interprets sensory information. For example, studying illusions can help us understand the ways in which attention and expectations can influence our perceptions, and how the brain fills in gaps in sensory information to create a coherent experience of the world.

Ben:

But then since all of our senses can indeed be deceived and illusions can be created, how much control do we have on our attention? And how is that related to hallucinations some people may have in certain conditions?

Danny:

Our control over our attention is limited, and our perceptions and experiences can be influenced by many factors, including our past experiences, expectations, attention, and context.

In some cases, this can lead to hallucinations, which are perceptual experiences that occur in the absence of an external stimulus. Hallucinations can be caused by a variety of factors, including mental illness, drugs, brain injury, sleep deprivation, and more.

Hallucinations can also occur in healthy individuals, for example, in the context of sensory deprivation, such as in a dark room or in a state of extreme boredom, or during sensory overload, such as in a loud, chaotic environment.

In all cases, hallucinations are thought to occur when the normal balance of brain activity is disrupted, and one or more parts of the brain are activated in the absence of an external stimulus.

Ben:

We’ve all heard of how we can induce the illusion of a rubber hand being our own appendage, so if we can indeed do that, what happens when we spend a lot of time driving a particular car or interacting with the world through some kind of machine? Do we think these are parts of our body, too?

Danny:

When we spend a lot of time interacting with a particular machine, such as a car, it is possible for our brain to incorporate the machine into our sense of self. This is similar to the rubber hand illusion, where the brain can be tricked into perceiving a fake hand as part of our own body.

In the case of driving a car, for example, the brain may become so familiar with the machine that it starts to feel like an extension of our own body. This can lead to a sense of “being in control” of the car, and a feeling of unity between the driver and the vehicle. This is known as “embodiment,” and it can play a role in how we experience the world and how we respond to our surroundings.

In the case of interacting with other machines, similar effects may occur, depending on the nature of the interaction and the extent to which the machine becomes incorporated into our sense of self.

Ben:

Can we say that this can be a positive thing when we talk about musicians for example. I mean highly talented musicians do feel that their instruments are an extension to their bodies, and so they have complete control over these instruments? Or are there negative sides to this effect?

Danny:

Yes, it is possible that feeling a close connection with a musical instrument, or any other tool, can be a positive thing and lead to improved performance. When a musician feels that their instrument is an extension of their body, they may have a greater sense of control over it, and this can result in a more fluid and natural playing style. This sense of embodiment can also foster a deep connection between the musician and their instrument, leading to greater expression and creativity.

However, it’s important to note that the relationship between embodiment and performance can be complex, and there may also be negative consequences. For example, over-identifying with a tool or machine can lead to a loss of perspective and reduce the ability to switch between tasks or adapt to new situations. Additionally, feeling a strong connection with a machine can also lead to a sense of over-reliance, reducing the ability to problem-solve and find alternative solutions.

Ben:

Alright then. Now let’s talk about another brain myth. What about objectivity? Are our brains objective?

Danny:

No, our brains are not objective. Objectivity refers to the ability to perceive and judge things without being influenced by personal feelings, opinions, or biases. However, the human brain is inherently subjective, meaning that it is influenced by personal experiences, beliefs, and emotions.

For example, people can have different perceptions of the same event, depending on their individual experiences and interpretations of the information. Additionally, our beliefs and values can influence how we process information and shape our understanding of the world. Our brain actively filters information, paying more attention to what is relevant to us and disregarding what is not.

Therefore, it’s important to be aware of our subjective biases and to make an effort to seek out multiple perspectives and consider different viewpoints. This can help to reduce the influence of personal biases and increase the likelihood of arriving at an objective understanding of a situation. However, it’s unlikely that anyone can be completely objective, and the best we can do is to strive towards objectivity by being self-aware and critically evaluating our own beliefs and interpretations.

Ben:

So, how can a judge, for example, be objective when he or she examines a case and decides the fate of the defendant?

Danny:

Judges are expected to make decisions that are based on the law and the evidence presented in a case, rather than personal opinions or biases. However, like all humans, judges are also influenced by their experiences, beliefs, and emotions. It’s impossible for a judge to completely eliminate all subjective influences from their decision-making process.

To mitigate the influence of personal biases, the legal system has established rules, procedures, and principles that aim to ensure fairness and impartiality. For example, judges are required to follow established legal precedents, interpret the law objectively, and consider all relevant evidence in a case. Additionally, they are expected to be transparent about any conflicts of interest or personal biases that may affect their decision-making.

While no judge can be completely objective, the aim is to strive towards impartiality and fairness. The legal system provides checks and balances to reduce the influence of personal biases, and to promote objective decision-making by judges. However, it’s still important to be aware of the limitations of human objectivity and to critically evaluate decisions made by judges to ensure that justice is being served.

Ben:

So, since we established the fact that our brains are not objective, is it safe to say that our brains are pattern detectors, which means that we look for regularities in the environment, and this tendency means that we search for evidence that supports our beliefs rather than information that might challenge them?

Danny:

Yes, it is accurate to say that our brains are wired to detect patterns, and this can influence the way we process information and form beliefs. Our brains have evolved to identify patterns quickly and efficiently, as this ability helps us make sense of the world and respond to potential threats.

However, this tendency to search for evidence that supports our beliefs, known as confirmation bias, can sometimes lead us to ignore or dismiss information that contradicts our beliefs. This can create a biased perspective and limit our ability to see different points of view or consider alternative explanations.

Therefore, it’s important to be aware of this tendency and make an effort to actively seek out information that challenges our beliefs. By being mindful of our biases and exposing ourselves to a diverse range of perspectives, we can broaden our understanding of the world and make more informed and objective decisions.

Ben:

How can we recognize confirmation bias in our own decision making or weighing of evidence?

Danny:

Recognizing confirmation bias in oneself can be challenging, as our brains naturally seek out information that supports our existing beliefs and ignore or downplay information that contradicts them. However, there are some strategies that can help:

Seek out diverse perspectives: Make an effort to expose yourself to a wide range of opinions, especially those that challenge your beliefs. This can help you identify and evaluate evidence objectively.

Challenge your assumptions: Regularly question the validity of your own beliefs and assumptions. Consider alternative explanations and try to imagine why someone might hold a different perspective.

Practice critical thinking: Develop your critical thinking skills by analyzing and evaluating evidence objectively, without letting your emotions or biases influence your judgment.

Seek out disconfirming evidence: Make a deliberate effort to find evidence that contradicts your beliefs. This can help you broaden your perspective and avoid the trap of confirmation bias.

Be open-minded: Be open to new information and be willing to change your beliefs if evidence supports it.

By being mindful of these strategies and making a conscious effort to counteract confirmation bias, you can improve your decision making and become a more objective thinker.

Ben:

These strategies are indeed very useful, but how much evidence should we consider before we change a belief we have?

Danny:

The amount of evidence needed to change a belief can vary depending on the individual and the belief in question. It’s important to consider all available evidence and weigh it objectively, considering both supporting and challenging information. However, changing a deeply held belief can often require a significant amount of evidence and may also involve overcoming cognitive and emotional biases. It’s also important to be open-minded and willing to change a belief if new evidence warrants it.

Ben:

So since we know for a fact that we all have this, let me call it, issue of confirmation bias, is there no benefit of having it? What might the benefit of confirmation bias be?

Danny:

Confirmation bias can serve a purpose in helping us make sense of the world and feel more confident in our beliefs and decisions. It allows us to quickly and easily process information that supports our beliefs and ignore information that contradicts them, which can save time and mental energy. This can also help us to feel a sense of certainty and stability in our beliefs.

However, it’s important to recognize and manage confirmation bias, as it can lead to distorted and inaccurate views of the world and can prevent us from considering new information and perspectives. In some cases, it can even lead to harmful decisions and actions. Balancing the benefits of confirmation bias with the need to seek accurate information and be open to new perspectives is crucial for making informed decisions and understanding the world around us.

Ben:

Alright then. Let’s move on and talk about yet another brain myth. Let’s talk about our senses. Do we really have five independent senses?

Danny:

The idea that we have five independent senses (sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell) is a widely held but outdated notion. Modern research suggests that our senses are not so independent and that they often interact and influence each other in complex ways. For example, the taste of food is heavily influenced by our sense of smell and the visual appearance of food can affect how we taste it. Additionally, our perceptions of touch, pressure, temperature, and pain are often integrated into a single experience. The notion of five independent senses is an oversimplification of the complex interplay of sensory information that our brain processes.

Ben:

Are there any senses we have other than the big five?

Danny:

Yes, there are more senses than the five commonly recognized ones (sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell). These include proprioception (awareness of body position and movement), kinesthesia (awareness of limb and body movement), nociception (awareness of pain), thermoception (awareness of temperature), and interoception (awareness of internal physiological sensations such as hunger and thirst). These senses play important roles in our perception and overall experience of the world.

Ben:

Well, back to our sense of taste, many people believe that we taste food with our tongue, and different parts of your tongue taste 1 of 5 different flavors: bitter, salty, sweet, sour, and umami, while the reality is different and taste perception is much more complex than simply where food hits your taste buds. In fact, taste is largely based on smell. What do you think about that?

Danny:

Taste is a complex process that involves multiple senses, including smell, texture, temperature, and more. While the tongue does play a role in taste, it is not limited to just 5 different flavors as was previously thought. The brain integrates information from various senses to produce a holistic experience of taste, and smell plays a particularly important role in flavor perception, as much as 80% of what we perceive as taste is actually due to our sense of smell. The tongue itself has receptors for different tastes, but it’s not a one-to-one mapping of flavor, and the actual experience of taste is much more complex than the tongue’s ability to detect certain tastes.

Ben:

Is feeling that all food tastes bland when we have the flu evidence of that fact?

Danny:

Yes, it’s true that our sense of taste can be affected by things like illness, particularly when it affects our sense of smell. When we have a cold or the flu, our sense of smell can become impaired, which can result in food tasting less flavorful. This is because a large part of what we perceive as taste is actually due to our sense of smell, and the two are closely intertwined. Our sense of smell helps us identify the odor molecules in food, and this information is processed by the brain to form our perception of taste. So when our sense of smell is diminished, our sense of taste is also impacted, which can result in food seeming less flavorful or even tasteless.

Ben:

So, it is true that we have a lot of sensory crossings. Can you give me some more examples of sensory crossing other than the relationship between the senses of smell and taste?

Danny:

Yes, there are many examples of sensory crossing. For instance, vision and touch often work together to give us a complete perception of an object. This is why objects appear differently when they are grasped or manipulated compared to when they are simply seen.

Similarly, the sense of hearing and touch often interact to provide us with information about the vibrations and movements of objects. This is why we can hear the sound of footsteps and feel the vibrations in the floor at the same time.

Another example is the relationship between vision and balance. Our sense of balance helps us maintain our upright posture, and it is heavily influenced by visual input. This is why it is difficult to stand on a moving surface like a boat, or why we feel dizzy when we spin around in circles.

Overall, sensory crossings show that our perception of the world is not based on any single sense working in isolation, but rather on the integration of information from multiple senses.

Ben:

Very well, we are left with one more brain myth to talk about. What about super foods? Can certain foods make us smarter?

Danny:

There is no evidence that consuming specific foods, such as blueberries or salmon, will make us smarter or enhance our cognitive abilities in any substantial way. However, a balanced and nutritious diet that includes a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins can help promote overall health and well-being, which in turn can positively impact cognitive function. It’s also important to maintain a healthy lifestyle, which includes regular physical activity, getting enough sleep, and managing stress, to support brain health.

Ben:

So, eating a healthy diet is important for brain health because the brain is so metabolically expensive. But so far, there aren’t any foods that consistently improve cognitive functions. Can we say that?

Danny:

Yes, that is correct. Eating a healthy, balanced diet can provide the necessary nutrients to support overall brain health and function, but there is no evidence to suggest that consuming any specific “super food” can consistently improve cognitive abilities. It is important to note that many factors, such as genetics, lifestyle, and environment, also play a role in cognitive functioning.

Ben:

So, since we talked about the importance of following a healthy diet, how bad can junk food be for the general health of our brain?

Danny:

Consuming a diet high in junk food, which is often high in sugar, salt, and unhealthy fats, can have negative effects on brain health. This kind of diet can lead to inflammation in the brain, as well as contribute to the development of chronic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, which can all have negative impacts on brain health. Additionally, a diet high in junk food can also lead to decreased function in the brain’s cognitive and learning abilities, such as memory and attention. So, it is important to consume a balanced and nutritious diet to support overall brain health.

Ben:

Can your brain tell the difference between healthy food and junk food?

Danny:

The brain can sense the difference between healthy food and junk food based on the nutrients and energy it receives, but it does not inherently “know” the difference. The brain receives signals from the digestive system about the type and quantity of nutrients being consumed and adjusts its metabolic processes accordingly. However, individual preferences and cultural norms play a larger role in determining what people consider to be healthy or junk food.

Ben:

So, our gut microbiome seems to have effect on our brains, but what effect might that be?

Danny:

The gut microbiome, which is the community of bacteria and other microorganisms that live in our digestive system, can have an effect on our brains through the gut-brain axis. This is the bidirectional communication pathway between the gut and the brain. Research suggests that the gut microbiome can affect the brain by releasing signaling molecules and regulating the immune system, which can impact mood, behavior, and cognition. Some studies have found that certain types of bacteria in the gut microbiome are associated with better cognitive function, while others have been linked to depression and anxiety. The relationship between the gut microbiome and the brain is complex and still not fully understood, but it highlights the importance of maintaining a healthy gut for overall health and well-being.

Ben:

Is it true to assume that our gut microbiome is kind of like our second brain?

Danny:

The concept of the gut microbiome as a “second brain” is a popular one, but it is not entirely accurate. The gut microbiome does have an effect on the brain, and there is a close communication between the gut and the central nervous system, but the gut microbiome is not a separate entity with its own intelligence or decision-making abilities. Instead, it functions more like a system that influences brain function through the release of neurotransmitters, hormones, and other signaling molecules. However, this is still an area of active research and much is yet to be learned about the exact mechanisms and the extent of the gut-brain connection.

Ben:

Very well! These were all the brain myths that we want to talk about today. Can you summarize the six myths we talked about the what the reality about them ism?

Danny:

Certainly! Here is a summary of the six brain myths we discussed today:

The first Myths was about whether we only use 10% of our brain, and this is a myth while the reality is that we use all of brain and, in fact, the reality is the opposite. If you don’t use a part of your brain for one function, it will get reassigned. Cortical real estate is competitive!

And the second brain myth was about perception and whether we see the world as it is. Well, this is indeed a myth and the reality is that we experience the world through our senses, and our senses only track a tiny portion of the environment. And our senses give us only a rough sketch; the brain fills in the rest.

Our brains are too smart for magic tricks – The reality is that our brains can be easily fooled by illusions and that studying how our brains react to magic tricks can give us an idea of how the brain processes information.

Our brains are objective – This is a myth as our brains are not objective, but they are influenced by our beliefs, values, and past experiences.

We have five independent senses – This is a myth as the senses are not independent, but rather they are interconnected and interdependent.

Super foods make us smarter – This is a myth as there is no scientific evidence to support that certain foods can consistently improve cognitive function. However, a healthy diet is important for brain health.

Ben:

Perfect! Thank you very much for discussing brain myths with me today. Since this is indeed a very interesting topic, maybe we should talk more about it next time.

Danny:

Absolutely, there’s still a lot to talk about when it comes to brain myths and we’re definitely going to do that in the weeks to come. Well, thank you, Ben. It was great to have a conversation about brain myths with you.

Ben:

You’re welcome. I really enjoyed our discussion about brain myths today.

Danny:

And to our listeners everywhere, thank you very much for listening to another Let’s Talk Science episode from English Plus Podcast. We hope you’ve liked the brain myths we discussed in our episode today, and we hope that you learned something new, because as you know that’s what English Plus is all about — never stop learning with English Plus. This is your host, Danny. Thanks again for listening. I will see you next time.

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