Word Power | The Pony Express

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What is this episode about?

Learn 10 new words from a text about The Pony Express, 10 new words about money, and 10 new words from the roots vid, vis, and audi. You will learn a lot of new words in context so that you can add them to your active vocabulary bank, all in this new Word Power episode from English Plus Podcast.

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I am using an automatic transcript service as it is not possible for me to do it on my own and I cannot afford human transcription at the moment. The service claims to have about 95% accuracy, which means there will still be some mistakes, so my apologies for having a less than perfect transcript, but I hope I can afford human transcription soon and I will solve this problem. However, the service is pretty good, and the transcript is almost perfect.

Transcript

Welcome to a new episode from English plus podcast. Today’s episode is word power two, and we’re going to talk about three things. In this episode, we’re going to talk about a text about the pony express and we will learn 10 words. From this text in context, and then we will talk about words we can use to talk about money.

[00:00:29] And then in the final part, we will talk about 10 words that have the root, that means to see or to hear, remember that you can support English plus podcast by becoming a patron of the show on Patreon and by becoming a patron. You will not only support English plus podcast, but you will also get a PDF practice worksheet for every single episode we launch.

[00:00:52] So if you decide to become a patron, you will find the link in the description. And now without further ado, let’s start our episode by talking about the pony express our text for today until the early 18 hundreds. Most Americans resided on the East coast. As the population of Eastern cities, swelled, many Americans began moving westward to settle the frontier.

[00:01:21] The West became even more enticing when gold was discovered at Sutter’s mill in California in January of 1848, product by craving for wealth and riches. Thousands of Americans settled in this promising territory. In addition to attracting minors and fortune hunters, the gold rush also lured merchants, crafts, persons, and farmers to the West.

[00:01:49] These new Californians needed a way to correspond with family, friends, and associates who remained in the East. In other words, they needed a fast, reliable, well method of mail delivery between the East and the West. At the time mail was sent across the country by stage coach, the coaches lumbered slowly over rough trails, and we’re at the mercy of the weather and bandits.

[00:02:16] The shortcomings of the stage coach led to the pony express and experiment in rapid mail delivery between Missouri and California, hoping to win a profitable government contract for cross-country mail delivery, the frighting and express firm of Russell majors and Waddell vowed to carry letters almost 2000 miles in less than 10 days.

[00:02:40] William happened, Russell planned a relay system of writers on horseback to provide fresh horses for the writers. The company established more than 100 station, approximately 15 miles apart, along a route through Nebraska, Wyoming, and Nevada, each writer wrote about 75 miles of the total route. The pony express eventually required nearly 100 writers and more than 400 horses.

[00:03:09] The service was inaugurated on April the third, 1860. The writers made the journey all year, even during the difficult winter months, even though the trip was hazardous, only one mail delivery was ever lost by late 1861. Russell majors and wattle had suffered serious money problems, the speed and ease of the Telegraph presented overwhelming competition to the pony express.

[00:03:37] When Overland Telegraph connections were completed in October of 1861 pony express service was discontinued. This celebrated effort to deliver the mail lasted less than 18 months. So that was our texts about the pony express and about this extraordinary, I wouldn’t call it experiment, but enterprise, it was not that lucky of an enterprise.

[00:04:02] Not because it was a failure or because it didn’t perform well, but because the telegram came soon after they started. But anyway, it was a very good example of early American entrepreneurs who try to solve real life problems with the enterprises they established. So now without further ado, let’s talk about the words we’re here for.

[00:04:23] We will start with resided and that came in the text. When we said until the early 18 hundreds, most Americans resided on the East coast. Resided is spelled R E S I D E N. Obviously the last D is because it came in the past. So the verb is reside. What is the meaning of reside? When we say you reside. If someone resides somewhere, they live there or they are staying there.

[00:04:54] So here, when we were talking about most Americans resided on the East coast, we mean that they lived there, but that’s not everything about reside. If a quality resides in something, the thing has that quality. For example, we say happiness does not reside in strength or money. And that’s another example of using reside, but mainly reside is used to talk about someone who lives somewhere.

[00:05:21] And now for the next word enticing, we sat in the text. The West became even more enticing when gold was discovered at Sutter’s mill in California in January of 1849, or I’m sorry, 1848. So here, what is the meaning of enticing? We said before that to understand the context of that we said before that people started to go to the West.

[00:05:46] But especially after gold was discovered in California, the West became even more enticing. What is the meaning of enticing? Are we talking about something attractive? Absolutely. Something that is enticing is extremely attractive and makes you want to get it or to become involved with it. So that is the meaning of enticing.

[00:06:09] And by the way, enticing is spelled E N T I C I N G. And now let’s move on to talk about the next word, broad. P R O D a in the text after we said that the West became more enticing, we said product by a craving for wealth and riches. Thousands of Americans settled in this promising territory. So actually he, we have two words.

[00:06:35] We have prod and craving. So let’s talk first about R P R O D prod. We said product by a craving for wealth and riches. What is the meaning of prod. If you prod someone into doing something you remind or pursue, wake them to do it. So why did people do this? What persuaded people to do that? What pushed people to do that?

[00:07:01] That is actually the meaning of prod product. What were they prodded by? What were they persuaded or pushed by, by a craving? And that’s the next word? C R a V I N G by a craving for wealth and riches and craving comes from the verb crave. If you crave something, you want to have it very much. And that craving for wealth and riches, that means you want to have, or actually we’re talking about people back then.

[00:07:32] And even now a lot of people have a craving for wealth and riches. So wherever wealth and riches are found. People have a graving for it. And they are prodded by this craving to do things sometimes. Not very nice things, to be honest. But anyway, here, we’re talking about prod and craving and now let’s move to the next word lure.

[00:07:55] We sat in the text in addition to attracting minors and fortune hunters, the gold rush also lured merchants craftspersons and farmers to the West. So it did not only attract minors. Obviously gold miners, all try to go there and to be the first to find gold, et cetera. But they were not the only ones. The gold rush also lured merchants craftspersons and farmers to the West.

[00:08:24] So what do we mean by lure, which is L U R E it lured the gold rush, lured other people as well. To lure someone means to trick them into a particular place or to trick them into doing something that they should not do well here, it’s a matter of opinion to say whether it was a trick or not, but we can take the meaning of lure in this context just as attract.

[00:08:50] So it attracted merchants craftspersons and farmers, but it was not always for their own benefit. Sometimes things did not turn out to be very well for them. But anyway, that is the meaning of lure. When we use lure here as a verb, that’s the main meaning to trick somebody into a particular place or to trick them into doing something they should not be doing.

[00:09:14] And we can use lure by the way, as a noun as well. We can say a lure can be an object, which is used to attract animals. So that they can be caught and that is definitely something animals shouldn’t be doing, but you make it attractive. You put cheese for mice, et cetera. So that is a lure as well. And we can use Leura as well to talk about an attractive quality that something has or something that you find attractive.

[00:09:41] So in a nutshell, To lure, especially here in the text means to attract or to bring them, to draw them closer. And we continue with the texts and we say these new Californians needed a way to correspond with family, friends, and associates who remained in the East. Not everybody came, not all the family traveled to the West.

[00:10:04] And not all business associates. Sometimes businesses would send people to the West, but the main business would stay in the East or at least their partners would stay in the East and the business would still operate both in the East and West. And of course, family members did not all come along and people needed to correspond with those people, with the family, friends, and associates.

[00:10:26] So what does it mean to correspond. To correspond, by the way, it’s spelled C O R R E S P O N D two correspond. Now, if you correspond with someone, you will write letters to them. You can also say that two people correspond, and that is the correspondence that happens between two people. And nowadays, of course, we can still use it.

[00:10:48] We can still say that there is correspondence between the two companies, but we don’t usually use it in informal cases. Because people rarely ever sent letters to each other, but that being said, corresponds can be used nowadays for another reason. And it is a common use of correspond. If one thing corresponds to another, there is a close similarity or connection between them.

[00:11:11] You can also say that two things correspond. Now here, if we say two things correspond, not two people correspond one thing corresponds to another. That means there is a close similarity or connection between those two things. So that being said, let’s move on to talk about the next word in our texts. And that is lumber, L U M B E R.

[00:11:34] We used it in the text when we said these coaches lumbered slowly over rough trails, and we’re at the mercy of weather and bandits. And we were talking about the coaches that were used to carry mail across the country between the East and the West. The problem with these coaches that they lumbered slowly over rough trails.

[00:11:57] So what do we mean by lumber? We’re definitely not talking about something that is fast here. Right? And remember, we use lumber here as a verb and here, if you lumber, or if someone or something lumbers from one place to another, they move there very slowly and clumsily. So that was the problem with stagecoaches.

[00:12:20] They were very slow and they were very clumsy and they were at the mercy of weather and bandits. So they were not reliable. They were not fast. They will not reliable. And that was why the pony express idea was born. Anyway. Lumber is used as a verb like this, but also remember that lumber is a very famous word that we use as a noun to talk about something that consists of trees and large pieces of wood that have been roughly cut up.

[00:12:51] That is also lumber. Okay. So that was about lumber. What about the next word? Approximate approximate app, R O X I M a T E. Now in the text, we use it as approximately as an adverb. So we just add lly to it. What did we say about that? We said to provide fresh horses for the writers, the company established more than 100 stations, approximately 15 miles apart, along the route through Nebraska, Wyoming, and Nevada.

[00:13:23] So here, we’re talking about these stations. 15 miles apart. But if it is exactly 15 miles, we would say a hundred stations, 15 miles apart. And that’s it, but it’s not exactly 15 miles and sometimes, maybe a little bit more than 15 miles between stations and sometimes, maybe a little bit less. But we need to give a number and we don’t need to talk about all this.

[00:13:47] We just need to say approximately 15 miles. So what do we mean by the approximate and approximate number? Time or position is close to the correct number, time or position? But not exact. And a lot of the times we don’t need to give exact numbers. Yes. We work in engineering or in finance and these numbers have a lot of things.

[00:14:11] Importance. Of course you can give approximate numbers. For example, we say, how much does it take you to do something? Whatever that thing is, you say, well, approximately 10 minutes, but it’s not exactly 10 minutes. You know, it can take a little bit more or a little bit less, but approximately 10 minutes. So here, these stations were approximately 15 miles apart.

[00:14:35] And now to the next word, inaugurate I N a U G U R a T E inaugurate. Now we used inaugurate in the text when we said the service was inaugurated on April the third, 1860. Now we talked about how they planned it and everything, the stations, the writers, the horses, et cetera. But when did it actually start officially?

[00:15:02] When was it inaugurated? It was inaugurated on April the third, 1860. So here, the meaning of inaugurate, if you inaugurate and use system or service you started, and that is exactly how we use it here, but inaugurate is a famous word for other meanings as well. We can use it for buildings or institutions when a new building or institution is inaugurated.

[00:15:28] It is declared open in a formal ceremony. And we can also use it with leaders. When a new leader is inaugurated, they are formally given their new position at an official ceremony. Like what happened with the new American president recently? So that being said, let’s move on to talk about the last word we want to focus on in this text.

[00:15:49] And that is overwhelming. The word is spelled O V E R w H E L M I N G. And in the text we said the speed and ease of the Telegraph presented overwhelming competition to the pony express. Now the Telegraph started, but it was too fast. And it was very easily installed and implemented. And that presented overwhelming competition.

[00:16:16] We’re not talking about some easy competition, mild competition. We’re talking about very strong competition. We’re talking about overwhelming competition. And later in the text we said, because of that, the service had to be discontinued. Because of this overwhelming competition, it’s very difficult for a company to stay alive in the face of overwhelming competition.

[00:16:39] So if something is overwhelming, it affects you very strongly and you do not know how to deal with it. And you can use overwhelming to emphasize that an amount or quantity is much greater than other amounts or quantities. It’s just so overwhelming. I didn’t know how to react. We can say that. Of course.

[00:16:58] It was too much. So these were the words that I wanted to talk about in the text. And now, before we start the second part of the episode, let me remind you that you can find the transcript of this episode in a link. I will leave in the description. So check the description. You will find the link that will take you to the transcript, and you will also find a link that will take you to Patreon page, where you can support this podcast and get the exclusive PDF practice worksheet.

[00:17:24] With every single episode we launch. So now let’s move on to talk about the second part of this episode. And we will learn about 10 more words that have to do with money. Now, whether you like it or not, money plays an important part in our lives, how much we make, how much we spend and whether we borrow or save has an impact on how we live.

[00:17:49] In this episode, we will study 10 words related to saving and spending money. And these words are credit. Currency economical, financial frugal, miser, poverty, prosperity. Spendthrift and thrifty. So let’s start with the very first word that is credits C E R E D I T. Credit. Let’s take an example. Julie could not pay for the ring all at once.

[00:18:16] So the store agreed to let her buy it on credit. Provided cheap pay at least $75 per month. So what is the meaning of credit here? Is it a type of money? Is it a kind of discount or is it a plan to pay over a period of time? Well, if you are allowed credit, you are allowed to pay for goods or services several weeks or months after you have received them.

[00:18:42] So that is the meaning of credit. In this example, the store allow Julie to bait for the ring several months after she has received it. So that is the meaning to buy something on credit, but credit has other meanings as well, of course, related to money. If someone or their bank accounts is incredible.

[00:19:03] Their bank account has money in it. So when your account is in credit, that means you have money. When a sum of money is credited to an account, the bank adds the sum of money to the total in the account. So. That is the meaning of credit. Let’s move on to talk about the next word. Currency currency is spelled C U R R E N C Y.

[00:19:26] And here’s an example. We found that most shops in Mexico accepted United States currency, but I always had trouble figuring out how much something costs in dollars. So what do we mean by currency here? United States currency? Are we talking about unusual goings or are we talking about a type of money used in a country?

[00:19:47] Actually we’re talking about a type of money used in a country. So the money used in a particular country is referred to as its currency. Like when we talk about the United States, we say dollars. When we talk about the European union, we use the euros. When we talk about great Britain, we use the pound, the English pound.

[00:20:07] Et cetera. And if we go to other countries, we will find that they have their own currencies as well. So that is the meaning of currency. Now let’s move on to talk about the next word. And that is economical. How do we spell economical? E C O N O M I C a L. And I want you to pay attention because that word comes from economic, of course, but it is definitely not economic.

[00:20:31] We’re not talking about the science of economy or some department at a university that studies economy and we call it economic, et cetera, or a situation. We say the economic situation, we’re talking about economical. Economical is different. Let’s see that. In an example, after seeing the bills, Alice knew she had to be more economical in running the house, comparing prices and doing without expensive food would help.

[00:20:59] So what does that mean? We’re talking about Elise after seeing the bills, she knew she had to be more economical. What does that mean? Does that mean she had to study economy? Of course not. We’re talking about, she needed to be careful in using money. So that is the meaning of economical. Someone who is economical, spends money sensibly and does not want to waste it on things that are not necessary.

[00:21:24] A way of life that is economical does not need a lot of money. We can use economical to talk about things as well. Something that is economical does not require a lot of money to operate. For example, a car that only uses a small amount of petrol is economical. So that was economical. Let’s move on to talk about the next word.

[00:21:44] And that is financial. Financial is spelled F I N a N C I a L. Let’s take an example to try to understand financial in context before approving the plan for a new stadium. The mayor met with several financial experts to be sure the city could afford such an expense. Now, when we talk about financial and he said, financial experts, what do we mean are related to sports?

[00:22:10] Because we’re talking about stadium. Does it mean expensive or highly paid or does it have to do with managing money? Actually, financial has to do with managing money. People who understand money management. So financial means relating or involving money. Financial experts are these people who understand this very well.

[00:22:32] Actually most of them studied at university and they have degrees in it to be a financial expert. Anyway, that is the meaning of financial. Sometimes we can use it to talk about the financial situation, whether it’s good or bad, but that being said, let’s move on to talk about frugal. And that is our next word.

[00:22:49] F R U G a L frugal. I believe in being frugal, but saving string and reusing paper towels is taken it a little too far for me. So this person is saying, I believe in being frugal. But not to the point where I have to save string and reuse paper towels. I mean, reuse paper towels, are you serious? That’s too much.

[00:23:14] And now of course we understand frugal has to do with saving money, but is it in a good way or in a bad way, are people who are frugal or who live frugal lives do not eat much or spend much money on themselves. So that is not necessarily a good thing. And it’s not necessarily a bad thing. To be honest, it depends.

[00:23:34] And some people make this choice because they don’t like money. And sometimes people do this because they have to, because there is no money, so they have to be frugal. But if you have enough money to live well, especially if you have a family. And you are frugal. Well, that’s questionable whether you should be like this or not.

[00:23:54] Especially the big question of course, is what are you doing with the money you’re saving? Are you doing something good with this money? So that kind of justifies why you’re living a frugal life or are you just stacking it up in a bank or something? I don’t know, that’s a matter of opinion. Of course.

[00:24:12] Anyway, what we’re here to do is to understand the word frugal F R U G a L. And we did so that is frugal. We can use it as well to talk about a meal, a frugal meal is small and not expensive. We talked about frugal and we said it is a debatable word, whether it’s a good thing or a bad thing. The next word we’re going to learn about is definitely a bad thing.

[00:24:33] A miser. When we say miser, it’s definitely bad. The old miser lived in a rundown little house, but thousands of dollars were found hidden under the floor. That is definitely disapproving, negative, whatever you may call it because you’re not spending a penny. You hate to spend money. So when we talked about frugal, yes.

[00:24:55] We said that frugal people save money, but here it’s not about saving money here. It’s that you don’t want to spend any money. If you say that someone is a miser, you disapprove of them because they seem to hate spending money and to spend as little as possible, or maybe nothing at all. Like in this example, we said the old miser lived in a rundown little house, very badly shaped house.

[00:25:19] But thousands of dollars were found hidden under the floor. He hit the money under the floor and after he died, people found the money. Well, maybe he could have spent a little more and live the little better. So miser is definitely a disapproving word. We always use it in a negative way. And now let’s move on to talk about the next word.

[00:25:39] That’s poverty. Let’s see an example. I was struck by the beautiful skyscrapers and fountains. However, I saw many homeless people, which meant that there was much poverty in the city. So yes, you see a lot of beautiful skyscrapers fountains, but there was much poverty in the city. Of course poverty comes from poor, but it is the noun.

[00:26:00] Poverty is the state of being extremely poor and the next word is prosperity. Let’s take a look at this example, thanks to the prosperity in our area. Few people are out of work. Uh, that’s just the opposite. Poverty is the state of being extremely poor, but prosperity is a condition in which a person or community is doing well financially.

[00:26:22] That’s just the opposite. And now we have two words that might sound very close to each other, but they’re just the opposite. The first word is spent thrift. The second word is thrifty. So let’s start with spendthrift. Margot is such a spendthrift. After one trip to the mall, her entire paycheck is gone. So one trip to the mall, the entire paycheck is gone.

[00:26:44] What does that mean? Does that mean we’re talking about a person who saves money. Of course not. We’re talking about a person who spends money wastefully. So if you call someone a spendthrift, you mean that they spend too much money and that is just the opposite when we say thrifty, but first let me say spendthrift is spelled S P E N D T H R I F T.

[00:27:07] That’s spent rift. Now thrifty is spelled T H R I F T Y. If you look at them, they’re very close and you may say that they’re the same meaning, but they’re just the opposite. Let’s take a look at thrifty thrifty, save money until they can pay cash for an item and thereby avoid the cost of borrowing money.

[00:27:28] So that is for thrifty buyers. If you say that someone is thrifty, you are praising them for saving money, not buying unnecessary things and not wasting things. So that brings us to the end of the second part of this word power episode, where we talked about 10 words that have to do with money spending, et cetera.

[00:27:46] And now for our last part, the last part of this episode, we will talk about a route, as we said, last time, these roots are not the most attractive thing you want to learn about, but they are very useful. Sometimes people think it’s a linguistic thing. It’s something that university students do. But it’s actually not.

[00:28:04] It’s very useful to understand, not only the words we’re going to talk about today, but also other words, when we see those roots and later we may talk about prefixes and suffixes as well. When we see these roots, we will understand. Then that this word has to do with this meaning. And now we will see examples, but before, let me tell you about the roots we’re going to learn for today.

[00:28:27] And we have three routes we’re going to talk about today. V I S or vis or vis depends and vid or vid. And both of these mean to see this, like when we say supervise and vid, like when we say evident and the third route is a U D I or ADI ADI, when we say, for example, audible, and now we will see other examples that has to do with hearing these words come from Latin, from the words video, which means to see, and its best part is simple, which is vicious.

[00:28:59] And there we have the roots V I S and V I D vis and vid. And there’s also the Latin word , which means to hear, and it appears in the root ODI. So now without further ado, let’s talk about the 10 words we’re going to learn based on these roots. The first word is audible, a U D I B L E. And as we said earlier, this has to do with sound.

[00:29:23] Let’s take a look at this example. The announcer’s introduction of the players was barely audible above the noise of the cheering crowd was barely audible. What does the meaning of audible a sound that is audible is loud enough to be heard? So the problem was there was a lot of noise of the cheering crowd and the announcer’s introduction was barely audible.

[00:29:47] We couldn’t hear it well because it was not clearly audible. So that was audible. What about audition? A U D I T I O N audition. Let’s take a look at this example. Anyone wishing to join the school choir must complete an application and sing the school song at an audition. And audition is a short performance given by an actor, dancer or musician so that a director or conductor can decide if they are good enough to be in a play film or orchestral, let’s say.

[00:30:20] So that was the meaning of audition. Somebody, of course, a person who can decide whether to take you or not. We’ll listen to you. We’ll hear you. So there was the ODI to hear and this audition, and now let’s take a look at the third word auditorium, a U D I T O R I U M. Auditorium, for example, all the students were asked to assemble at the auditorium for a speech by the new superintendent.

[00:30:49] So an auditorium, what is that? It’s a big hole obviously. And auditorium is the part of a theater or concert hall where the audience sits. And it can be in itself. We call it an auditorium is a large room hall or building, which is used for events, such as meetings and concerts. Like the Albert Hall. We can say the Albert Hall is a huge auditorium.

[00:31:11] So that was auditorium. Let’s take a look at the next example and the next word. And that is auditory. Some physicians feel that listening to loud music day after day can eventually damage one’s auditory nerves. Auditory is a U D I T O R Y. Auditory. What do we mean by that? Auditory is something related to hearing.

[00:31:35] So here, we’re talking about the nerves. We’re talking about something related to the hearing nerves. So these are the auditory nerves. And now let’s move on to talk about the other two routes we talked about and we have the word evident. E V I D E N T. Let’s take a look at this example. Ramona’s disappointment in not making the team was evident from the sad look on her face.

[00:31:57] You can see that clearly. See it. You see, remember we talked about these roots that have to do with seeing, and if something is evident, you notice it easily and clearly you can see it. So that is evident. Her disappointment was evident because she did not make the team. And now let’s take a look at the next word, revise.

[00:32:17] R E V I S E. Let’s take a look at this example. After Mr. Madi explained how my essay could be improved, he asked me to revise it and turn it in next week. Now, when we talk about revise, we have many meanings. If you revise an article like in this example, which can also be set for a book, a law or a piece of music, you change it in order to improve it, make it more modern, or make it more suitable for particular purpose.

[00:32:45] You can use that for an examination. When you revise an examination, you read things again and again, and make notes in order to be prepared for the examination. And sometimes you revise the way you think about something, and that means you adjust your thoughts, usually in order to make them better or more suited to how things are.

[00:33:03] So that is the meaning of revise. To look again at something. And that brings us to the next word supervise S U P E R V I S E for example, it is my brother’s job to supervise the cook and for weight persons, to be sure their work is done properly. So, what does it mean to supervise? If you supervise an activity or a person, you make sure that the activity is done correctly or that the person is doing a task or behaving correctly.

[00:33:33] So that is to supervise, to keep an eye on something or someone and make sure the work is done correctly. And now let’s move on to the next word, visionary. V I S I O N a R Y visionary. Let’s take a look at this example, the comedies visionary plan for the new airport included runways for space shuttles.

[00:33:55] So visionary can have many meanings. If you refer to someone as a visionary, you mean that they have strong original ideas about how things might be different in the future, especially about how things might be improved. And that plan is visionary. They included runways for space shuttles, which might not be needed today, but they have this original idea.

[00:34:16] They can see things in the future that not everyone else sees visionary people. We can use visionary to describe the strong or original ideas of a visionary person or visionary. And we can say visionary, see the world ahead in terms of what it can be. And now for our next word, visor, V I S O R. The pitcher pulled down the visor on his cap, clenched his teeth and glared at the batter.

[00:34:46] So what is the visor? Well, the visor is the movable part of a helmet, which can be pulled down to protect a person’s eyes or face. And that’s exactly what happened here. And this game of baseball and advisor is also a piece of plastic or other material fixed above the windscreen, inside a car, which can be turned down to protect the driver’s eyes from bright sunshine.

[00:35:09] So that is the visor. And as you can see, all these words have to do with seeing now the last word that has to do with seeing and the last word for today is Vista V I S T a. Let’s take a look at this example as the hot air balloon Rose above the mountain, the breathtaking Vista of the Arizona desert came into view.

[00:35:33] And now the Vista is a view from a particular place, especially a beautiful view from a high place. And that is exactly what we’re talking about here. When you are in a hot air balloon. Now the Vista can also mean something else. Metaphorical, not literal like a vision of a situation or of a range of possibilities.

[00:35:53] So that was Vista. And that was the last word for our episode today. I hope you liked the words that we learned today. I hope you can use them in your own writing and speaking. And may these words become a part of your active vocabulary bank. The words you can use, not only the words you can understand.

[00:36:11] That being said, don’t forget that you can find the transcript of the episode in a link. I will leave in the description and don’t forget to support English plus podcast by becoming a patron and get the exclusive PDF practice worksheet with its answer key. For every single episode we launch every day.

[00:36:28] With that being said, this is your host, Danny. Thank you very much for listening to another episode from English plus podcast. And I will see you next time.

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