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Learn about A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens in our Let’s Talk Literature episode from English Plus Podcast. Learn about the major characters, plot, themes and much more in this episode.

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Let’s Talk Literature | A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

Danny:

Welcome to a new Let’s Talk Literature episode from English Plus Podcast. In this episode, we will talk about another immortal book, this time written by Charles Dickens. In this episode, we will discuss A Tale of Two Cities. For those of you who haven’t read this book yet, I can tell you one thing; You have no idea what you’re missing, as this is indeed one of the books you must read before you die.

In this episode, we will talk about the story of A Tale of Two Cities, we will discuss the characters, the themes, the background of the novel and much more, so if you’re interested in learning more about A Tale of Two Cities, stick around while Ben and I discuss Charles Dickens’ masterpiece in detail.

Well, first let me start by talking about the great man himself, Charles Dickens.

Described as “the greatest English novelist,” Charles Dickens is studied more than any other author writing in English, except for Shakespeare. While his popularity with critics has fluctuated over time, Dickens’ works have never lost their appeal for general readers, thanks to the universality of his writing. He infused his realistic depictions of society and memorable characters with enough humor and  sensitivity to entertain and satisfy both casual and serious readers.

Charles Dickens was born in Portsmouth, England on February 7, 1812. He was the second of eight children and his family experienced financial difficulties throughout his childhood. Despite these difficulties, Dickens was a voracious reader and was able to receive a decent education. However, at the age of 12, his father was sent to debtors’ prison and Dickens was forced to work in a factory to support his family. This experience had a profound impact on him and shaped his views on social justice and the treatment of the working class.

Dickens began his career as a journalist and quickly gained popularity as a writer of serialized novels, including “The Pickwick Papers” and “Oliver Twist.” He went on to become one of the most successful and popular authors of his time, producing classics such as “Great Expectations,” “David Copperfield,” and “A Tale of Two Cities.”

In addition to his writing, Dickens was known for his public speaking and charitable work. He was a strong advocate for social reform and used his platform to raise awareness about issues such as poverty, education, and the treatment of prisoners.

Charles Dickens died on June 9, 1870, at the age of 58. He remains one of the most widely read and beloved authors in the English language, and his works continue to be enjoyed by readers of all ages and backgrounds.

Ben:

Alright, now let’s move on and start talking about the novel itself. Let’s give our listeners a short synopsis on what happened in the story.

Danny:

Certainly! “A Tale of Two Cities” is divided into three books and follows multiple characters as they navigate the political and social upheaval of the French Revolution.

Book One introduces the main characters and sets the stage for the events to come. Charles Darnay, a French aristocrat, is on trial for treason and is saved from execution by Sydney Carton, a drunken lawyer who bears a striking resemblance to him. The novel also introduces Lucie Manette, the daughter of a former prisoner who has been released after spending 18 years in the Bastille. Lucie marries Charles and they have a daughter together.

Book Two explores the events of the French Revolution and the growing tensions between the aristocracy and the working class. Charles and Lucie are caught up in the violence and are forced to flee to England. Meanwhile, Sydney Carton, who is deeply in love with Lucie, struggles with his feelings and begins to plot a way to save Charles and Lucie from the revolution.

Book Three focuses on the culmination of the events of the revolution and the sacrifices made by the characters. Carton, who has been transformed by his love for Lucie, sacrifices himself in order to save Charles and Lucie. He takes Charles’ place at the guillotine and dies in his place, allowing Charles and Lucie to escape to safety.

The novel ends with a reflection on the events of the revolution and the impact they had on the lives of the characters. Through the sacrifices made by Carton and the perseverance of Lucie, the novel suggests that even in the darkest of times, hope, love, and redemption can endure.

Ben:

Dickens starts the book with one of the most famous book openers of all time. He starts with “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times”, and the first paragraph continues with those contrasts. What is the meaning and significance of the opening of A Tale of Two Cities?

Danny:

The opening lines of “A Tale of Two Cities” are often considered to be one of the most famous in all of literature. The phrase “it was the best of times; it was the worst of times” captures the duality and contrasts that are present throughout the novel.

The opening lines reflect the larger themes of the novel, which include the contrasts between good and evil, life and death, love and hatred, and freedom and oppression. The French Revolution, which serves as the backdrop for the novel, was a time of great upheaval and change, and the opening lines reflect the dichotomy of this time. On the one hand, it was a time of great hope and change, as the people rose up against the tyranny of the aristocracy. On the other hand, it was a time of great violence and terror, as the reign of terror took hold and the guillotine claimed countless lives.

The opening lines of the novel also suggest that these contrasts are not limited to the events of the French Revolution but are universal and timeless. The duality of the opening lines can be applied to many different times and places, and reflects the idea that life is full of both good and bad, joy and sorrow, and that these contrasts are intertwined and inescapable.

In short, the opening lines of “A Tale of Two Cities” set the stage for the larger themes of the novel and serve as a powerful introduction to the events and characters that are to come. The contrasts and dualities of the opening lines reflect the larger ideas and questions that the novel explores, and suggest that the events of the French Revolution are not limited to a specific time and place, but are universal and timeless.

Ben:

Ok, Let’s identify some other quotes from the novel and talk about their significance. What about “I have sometimes sat alone here of an evening, listening, until I have made the echoes out to be the echoes of all the footsteps that are coming by and by into our lives.”?

Danny:

The quote you mentioned, is a significant one in “A Tale of Two Cities”. This quote highlights the idea of the inevitability of change and the passage of time. The echoes that the speaker hears are symbols of the events, people, and experiences that will eventually come into their life, whether they are ready for them or not.

The quote also touches on the idea of fate and the sense of an inevitable destiny. The echoes that the speaker hears are not just random sounds, but are the footsteps of the future, a future that is already predetermined and cannot be altered. The idea of an inevitable fate is a recurring theme in “A Tale of Two Cities”, as the characters struggle to come to terms with the events of the French Revolution and the forces that are driving them forward.

Finally, the quote highlights the sense of solitude and introspection that is present in the novel. The speaker is sitting alone, listening to the echoes, and reflecting on the future and the events that are to come. This sense of introspection is common throughout the novel, as the characters struggle to understand their own motivations and the forces that are shaping their lives.

Ben:

And what about what Madame Defarge said, “When the time comes, let loose a tiger and a devil; but wait for the time with the tiger and the devil chained—not shown, yet always ready.” What’s the significance of this quote?

Danny:

The quote by Madame Defarge in “A Tale of Two Cities” is significant because it speaks to the theme of revenge and the consequences of repression and oppression. Madame Defarge is a central figure in the novel and is portrayed as a ruthless and cunning revolutionary who is determined to exact revenge against those who have wronged her family.

The tiger and the devil in the quote can be seen as symbols of the violence and destruction that Madame Defarge is capable of unleashing. The fact that these symbols are “chained” suggests that she is holding back her anger and aggression, waiting for the right moment to act. However, the fact that the tiger and devil are “not shown, yet always ready” suggests that Madame Defarge is always waiting in the shadows, ready to strike when the time is right.

The quote speaks to the idea that repression and oppression can lead to a build-up of anger and frustration, which can then be unleashed in violent and destructive ways. It suggests that those who have been wronged will eventually seek revenge, and that this desire for revenge can be a powerful and dangerous force.

Ben:

Let’s talk about one more quote. “It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.” Who said that in the novel and what is the significance of this quote?

Danny:

The quote is spoken by the character Sydney Carton.

This quote is significant because it highlights the theme of sacrifice and redemption. Sydney Carton sacrifices himself at the end of the novel in order to save Charles Darnay, and this quote suggests that he views his sacrifice as a positive and noble action. He believes that his death will lead to a better future for Darnay and Lucie Manette, and that he himself will find a “better rest” in death than he ever knew in life.

The quote also highlights the theme of the power of love. Sydney Carton loves Lucie Manette but realizes that she can never love him back in the same way. Despite this, he is willing to sacrifice himself in order to save Charles Darnay, whom Lucie loves.

Finally, the quote is significant because it highlights the theme of transformation. Sydney Carton is portrayed as a drunken and disreputable lawyer at the beginning of the novel, but by the end, he has transformed into a selfless hero who is willing to make the ultimate sacrifice for love.

Ben:

Now Let’s move on to talk about and analyze the main characters of the novel. Let’s start with Doctor Alexander Manette.

Danny:

Doctor Alexandre Manette is a central character in Charles Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities”. He is a French physician who was imprisoned in the Bastille for 18 years without trial. When he is finally released, he is suffering from physical and psychological trauma, and he is taken to England where he is reunited with his daughter Lucie.

Doctor Manette is a complex and multi-faceted character. On one hand, he is depicted as a kind and gentle man who has been broken by his experience in the Bastille. He is portrayed as a victim of the corrupt and unjust French legal system, and as a symbol of the suffering of the French people during the time of the Revolution.

On the other hand, Doctor Manette is also depicted as a man of immense inner strength and resilience. Despite his suffering, he is able to slowly rebuild his life in England, and he becomes a source of stability and comfort for his daughter Lucie. He also shows remarkable courage when he returns to France in order to help save Charles Darnay from execution.

The character of Doctor Alexandre Manette is significant because he serves as a symbol of the resilience and dignity of the human spirit in the face of adversity. He also represents the idea that it is possible to overcome even the most traumatic experiences, and that hope and love can triumph over fear and despair.

Ben:

What about his daughter, Lucie Manette who becomes later, Lucie Darnay?

Danny:

Lucie Manette is the daughter of Doctor Alexandre Manette and the central female character in Charles Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities”. She is depicted as a beautiful, gentle, and compassionate young woman who is dedicated to helping those in need. She is depicted as a symbol of love, hope, and redemption, and she serves as the emotional center of the novel.

Lucie is first introduced in the novel as a young woman who is reunited with her long-lost father, Doctor Manette. Despite her father’s trauma and brokenness, she is able to bring light and hope back into his life, and she becomes his primary caretaker and source of comfort.

Throughout the course of the novel, Lucie continues to play a central role in the lives of those around her. She helps to bring Charles Darnay and Sydney Carton together, and she serves as a mediating force between the two men. She also acts as a peacemaker during the time of the French Revolution, and she helps to bring about a sense of hope and redemption in a time of darkness and despair.

Ben:

Now, Let’s talk about the character of Charles Darnay.

Danny:

Charles Darnay is one of the central characters in Charles Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities”. He is depicted as a French aristocrat who is caught up in the events of the French Revolution. Darnay is depicted as a complex and multi-faceted character, who is torn between his loyalty to his family and his own sense of morality.

At the beginning of the novel, Darnay is portrayed as a proud and aloof young man who is determined to maintain his family’s status and wealth, even in the face of the increasing chaos and violence of the French Revolution. He is depicted as a symbol of the corrupt and decadent French aristocracy, and as a representative of the privilege and entitlement that helped to fuel the anger of the revolutionary masses.

However, as the novel progresses, Darnay’s character evolves, and he becomes increasingly aware of the suffering of the French people. He becomes more compassionate and empathetic, and he begins to question the values and beliefs that have guided his life. He is ultimately put to the test when he is tried and sentenced to death during the Reign of Terror.

The character of Charles Darnay is significant because he represents the idea that people are capable of change, and that it is possible to evolve and grow beyond one’s circumstances and upbringing. He also serves as a symbol of the tension between loyalty to family and loyalty to one’s own conscience, and he helps to explore the themes of redemption and sacrifice that run throughout the novel.

Ben:

And what about Sydney Carton?

Danny:

Sydney Carton is one of the central characters in A Tale of Two Cities. He is depicted as a drunken and disheveled lawyer who is deeply in love with Lucie Manette, the daughter of Doctor Manette. Despite his love for Lucie, Carton is unable to win her heart, and he is consumed by jealousy and self-pity.

Throughout the novel, Carton is portrayed as a man who is deeply flawed and full of contradictions. He is depicted as a drunken slacker who is unable to take control of his life, but who also possesses a deep and abiding sense of love and compassion. He is a man who is haunted by his own self-doubt and self-loathing, but who is also capable of great acts of courage and selflessness.

Carton’s most memorable moment in the novel comes at the end, when he sacrifices his own life in order to save Charles Darnay, who has been sentenced to death during the Reign of Terror. Carton’s act of sacrifice is a powerful expression of his love for Lucie, and it is also a demonstration of his belief in the idea of redemption.

The character of Sydney Carton is significant because he represents the idea that even the most flawed and damaged individuals are capable of great acts of love and compassion. He also serves as a symbol of the idea that people are capable of change, and that it is possible to find redemption, even in the darkest moments of life.

Ben:

What about the Defarge couple?

Danny:

Ernest and Therese Defarge are two of the supporting characters in Charles Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities.” Ernest Defarge is a wine shop keeper and a former servant of the Manette family, who becomes a leader of the radical revolutionary group known as the Jacques during the French Revolution. Therese Defarge is his wife and is depicted as a cold and calculating woman who is consumed by hatred for the aristocracy and by a desire for revenge against those who wronged her family.

The Defarge couple play a central role in the novel, as they embody the anger and violence of the French Revolution. They are depicted as harsh and unyielding figures who are committed to the overthrow of the old order and the establishment of a new and more just society.

At the same time, however, the Defarges are also depicted as being consumed by their own hatred and thirst for revenge. They are depicted as individuals who are unable to see the world in any other way than through the lens of their own anger and resentment, and who are unable to recognize the human consequences of their actions.

The Defarges are significant because they serve to highlight the dangers of allowing anger and hatred to dictate one’s actions. They also serve to demonstrate the idea that revolutions can have unintended consequences, and that the forces of anger and violence can sometimes spiral out of control.

Ben:

So, we see that both Charles Darnay and Sydney Carton started the novel as certain types of men and finished it as different men, which signifies the capability of change in people, and in their case, for the better. But when the guillotine comes down as it did in the Reign of Terror, it doesn’t take into consideration that people can change, and it doesn’t even give them a chance to defend themselves. I see this as a powerful depiction by Dickens of the realities and horrors of one of the best and worst events that happened in human history, the French Revolution.  And the deep message within this idea still applies today. If we allow hatred to crawl into our hearts so much that our own judgment is blinded by it, we will almost always be on the wrong. What do you think about that?

Danny:

I agree with you that the novel “A Tale of Two Cities” serves as a powerful depiction of the French Revolution and the complexities and realities of social and political change. The idea that people have the capability to change, but that the forces of revolution do not always take this into consideration, is indeed a central theme of the book.

The contrast between the transformations undergone by Darnay and Carton, and the inflexibility and blindness of the revolution, serves to highlight the dangers of allowing anger and hatred to dictate one’s actions. The portrayal of the guillotine as indiscriminate and unyielding, cutting down both the guilty and the innocent, serves to demonstrate the idea that revolutions can have unintended consequences, and that the forces of anger and violence can sometimes spiral out of control.

In this way, the book serves as a warning against the dangers of allowing anger and hatred to cloud our judgment, and it highlights the importance of recognizing the humanity in others and the capacity for change. The message of the novel still holds relevance today, as societies continue to grapple with complex social and political issues, and as individuals continue to struggle with the challenge of balancing their emotions and beliefs with the demands of justice and the greater good.

Ben:

Now before we move on to talk about some of the major themes in the novel. Let’s finish our discussion and analysis of the characters of A Tale of Two Cities by comparing and contrasting the characters of Charles Darnay and Sydney Carton.

Danny:

Certainly. Charles Darnay and Sydney Carton are two of the main characters in “A Tale of Two Cities,” and they are notable for their stark contrasts. While they share some similarities, such as their compassion and courage, they are fundamentally different in many ways.

Charles Darnay is a French aristocrat who renounces his wealth and privilege to become an advocate for the poor and oppressed. He is a noble and virtuous character, who is loved by Lucie Manette and respected by others for his compassion and integrity. Despite his good intentions, Darnay finds himself caught up in the political turmoil of the French Revolution, and he becomes a target of the revolutionary forces due to his association with the aristocracy.

Sydney Carton, on the other hand, is a drunken, slothful lawyer who initially seems to lack any sense of purpose or ambition. Despite his outward appearance, however, Carton harbors a deep sense of love for Lucie Manette, and he eventually transforms into a self-sacrificing hero who is willing to give his life to save Darnay.

In many ways, Darnay and Carton represent the two sides of human nature: the nobility and virtue of one, and the weakness and depravity of the other. Yet both characters are also capable of change, and they are ultimately united in their love for Lucie and their willingness to sacrifice themselves for the greater good.

The contrast between Darnay and Carton serves to highlight the theme of redemption and the transformative power of love, as well as the idea that the actions of individuals can have a profound impact on the world around them. Through their characters, Dickens demonstrates the idea that every person has the potential to be a hero or a villain, depending on the choices they make and the values they hold.

Ben:

Alright. Let’s talk about women in A Tale of Two Cities. How important was the role of women in the novel?

Danny:

Women play an important role in “A Tale of Two Cities” and they are portrayed as symbols of love, purity, and hope. Lucie Manette, the central female character, serves as the embodiment of these qualities and helps to bring out the best in the male characters around her, particularly Charles Darnay and Sydney Carton. The Defarges, specifically Madame Defarge, represents the opposite of these qualities, embodying bitterness, hatred, and cruelty. The contrast between the two women highlights the stark differences between love and hate, and the power that women can hold over the lives of the male characters. Through the portrayal of women, Dickens shows how women can have a profound impact on the world around them and can be agents of change for good or evil.

Ben:

How does Charles Dickens depict crowds and mobs throughout the novel? What does Dickens seem to be saying about large groups of people?

Danny:

Throughout “A Tale of Two Cities,” Charles Dickens depicts crowds and mobs as dangerous and unpredictable forces that can quickly turn violent. The French Revolution serves as the backdrop to the novel, and the actions of the mobs during the Reign of Terror reflect the violence and chaos of the historical event. Dickens depicts the mobs as being easily swayed by emotions, particularly fear and anger, and being quick to turn on those they had previously claimed to support. The mobs are shown as being controlled by propaganda and manipulation and as being blind to the truth, often mistaking those who are innocent for those who are guilty.

By depicting the crowds and mobs in this way, Dickens seems to be warning against the dangers of mob mentality and the importance of independent thought and reason. He also shows the destructive power of hate and fear, and the importance of compassion, empathy, and justice in a society. Through his portrayal of the mobs, Dickens highlights the need for individuals to resist the urge to blindly follow the masses and to think for themselves and act according to their own conscience.

Ben:

A major criticism of A Tale of Two Cities is that Dickens does not fully develop his characters. Do you agree with this assessment?

Danny:

This is a matter of opinion, but many critics and readers would argue that Dickens does not fully develop some of the characters in A Tale of Two Cities. While he creates vivid, memorable characters such as Sydney Carton and Charles Darnay, some of the other characters, particularly those in the supporting cast, are more stereotypical or caricatures rather than fully realized individuals.

However, this lack of character development is in line with the way Dickens often wrote his novels, which emphasized plot and social commentary over character psychology. Moreover, given the scope and scale of the novel, with its large cast of characters and multiple storylines, it’s understandable that some characters would not receive as much attention as others.

Overall, while the criticism that Dickens doesn’t fully develop his characters in A Tale of Two Cities is valid, it also must be taken in context of his writing style and the historical and cultural context in which the novel was written.

Ben:

What about the use of light and shadow imagery throughout the novel? What can you tell me about that?

Danny:

Light and shadow imagery is a prominent aspect of Charles Dickens’ writing style in A Tale of Two Cities, serving as a metaphor for the good and evil characters and their actions. Light is often associated with purity, innocence, and hope, and is used to depict characters such as Lucie Manette and her daughter. On the other hand, darkness and shadows are often used to symbolize the negative aspects of society, including poverty, death, and evil. This imagery can be seen throughout the novel in the description of the contrasts between the two cities, Paris and London, and the character development of the two central male characters, Charles Darnay and Sydney Carton. The use of light and shadow imagery helps to emphasize the overarching themes of the novel, such as the cruelty of the French Revolution and the power of redemption and sacrifice.

Ben:

Dickens is known for his humor, but A Tale of Two Cities is noticeably somber. Do any comic passages and characters exist in the novel?

Danny:

Yes, there are some comic passages and characters in A Tale of Two Cities. For example, Mr. Lorry, who works for Tellson’s Bank, is a comically absent-minded character. His frequent forgetfulness provides a source of humor throughout the novel. Additionally, the character of Jerry Cruncher, who works as a messenger for Tellson’s Bank, is depicted as a bumbling and ignorant man, which also adds some comedic relief to the novel. These characters serve to balance out the darker and more serious themes of the novel, such as the Reign of Terror, and to provide a respite for the reader from the intense emotions of the story.

Ben:

And finally, what about Dickens’ views of the French Revolution. Does he believe it was inevitable or preventable? What are his attitudes toward the French royalty and aristocrats? Toward the peasants and revolutionaries?

Danny:

In A Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens portrays the French Revolution as both inevitable and preventable. On the one hand, he shows the poverty and suffering of the French peasants, as well as the corrupt and oppressive nature of the French aristocracy, which led to the Revolution becoming inevitable. On the other hand, he also portrays the Revolution as preventable, in that if the aristocracy had been more just and compassionate, and if the people had been better educated and organized, the Revolution might have been averted. Throughout the novel, Dickens presents a nuanced view of the Revolution and its participants. He is critical of both the French aristocracy, who are depicted as selfish and corrupt, and of the revolutionary leaders and mobs, who are depicted as being driven by violence and hatred. At the same time, he also portrays individual characters from both groups who are good and kind, and who are ultimately victims of the larger forces of history.

Ben:

Alright, now let’s talk about some themes present in A Tale of Two Cities before we wrap up our discussion of the novel. Let’s start by talking about the ever-present possibility of resurrection in A Tale of Two Cities.

Danny:

The theme of resurrection is a recurring one in A Tale of Two Cities. The idea is represented through the character of Dr. Manette, who is freed from his years-long imprisonment in the Bastille and restored to life, and through the character of Sydney Carton, who sacrifices himself for Charles Darnay and “resurrects” in a sense through his actions. The theme can be interpreted as a commentary on the idea of transformation and the possibility of change, even in the most difficult of circumstances. The characters’ experiences of resurrection can be seen as a metaphor for the possibility of rebirth and renewal that is available to all people.

Ben:

Can you tell me more about the theme of justice in the novel. It’s definitely a controversial version of justice we can find in A Tale of Two Cities, so what do you think?

Danny:

The theme of justice in A Tale of Two Cities is definitely a complex one. Charles Dickens uses the idea of legal justice, which is based on the social and political conditions of the time, versus personal justice, which often features retribution and judgment without due process. Throughout the novel, Dickens presents several characters in different situations who must choose to either conform to societal standards or pursue their own form of moral justice for themselves and those around them. This often leads to difficult and sometimes dangerous decisions.

  Ben:

What about the theme of sacrifice in the novel?

Danny:

The theme of sacrifice is an important one in A Tale of Two Cities. Dickens demonstrates that noble acts of self-sacrifice are key to achieving justice and peace. This can be seen in the actions of several characters, such as Sydney Carton sacrificing himself in order to save Charles Darnay and Lucie Manette, or Miss Pross sacrificing her own safety in order to save Lucie. Through these examples, Dickens is emphasizing the idea that true justice can only be achieved when individuals are willing to make personal sacrifices in pursuit of a greater good.

Ben:

And what about the class conflict as depicted in A Tale of Two Cities?

Danny:

Class conflict is a major theme in A Tale of Two Cities, and it is one that Dickens emphasizes throughout the novel. Dickens presents the struggle between the nobility and the lower classes in a stark and powerful way. He highlights how the laws of the time were heavily biased in favor of the upper classes and how the lower classes were often mistreated and neglected. In the novel, the lower classes eventually take up arms against the aristocracy, and Dickens implies that while class conflict can often result in violence and suffering, it can also be a force of necessary change that brings about a more just and equitable society.

Ben:

And finally, what about the tendency toward violence and oppression in revolutionaries?

Danny:

Dickens highlights in A Tale of Two Cities that the same forces of oppression that revolutionaries are fighting against can sometimes be perpetuated by them. This is seen in the actions of certain characters, such as Madame Defarge, who takes up arms against the aristocracy but herself becomes oppressive and violent in the process of seeking justice. Here, Dickens is showing how those seeking to bring about change must be careful not to become what they are resisting. He ultimately demonstrates that while violence can sometimes be necessary to initiate a revolution, it should not become the only means of enacting change.

Ben:

I guess that’s everything about Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities. Of course, we could talk on and on about it as it is indeed a very rich novel that does have a lot of controversial themes and characters, but I hope we have provided you with an extended introduction, and although we included some spoilers in our episode today, reading the novel is a completely different experience that you should never miss. What do you think, Danny? Why would you recommend people read A Tale of Two Cities?

Danny:

A Tale of Two Cities is an important novel that covers a wide range of themes. It offers an interesting and thought-provoking exploration of justice, sacrifice, class conflict, and the tendency toward violence and oppression. Dickens’ exploration of these topics is both timely and relevant, and it can offer insight into our own times.  Additionally, A Tale of Two Cities is a classic work of literature with beautiful prose and deeply moving characters, making it an enjoyable read.

And with that, I believe that will be everything we would like to discuss about A Tale of Two Cities. Thank you, Ben, for cohosting this episode with me.

Ben:

It’s been a pleasure.

Danny:

And to our listeners everywhere, thank you very much for listening to our Let’s Talk Literature episode and remember that we have a new Let’s Talk Literature episode every Friday, so don’t forget to come back for more, and remember that we have daily episodes about a variety of topics that you might find interesting enough so you would tune in to listen and learn more about them.

That’s everything for today. This is your host, Danny. Thank you for listening. I will see you next time.

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<a href="https://englishpluspodcast.com/author/dannyballanowner/" target="_self">Danny Ballan</a>

Danny Ballan

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Danny is a podcaster, teacher, and writer. He worked in educational technology for over a decade. He creates daily podcasts, online courses, educational videos, educational games, and he also writes poetry, novels and music.

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