Idioms Intermediate | Hapiness and Sadness

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Learn new way to describe happiness and sadness with the idioms you are going to learn in this episode from English Plus Podcast about the idioms we use to describe happiness and sadness.

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I am using an automatic transcript service as it is not possible for me to do it on my own and I cannot afford human transcription at the moment. The service claims to have about 95% accuracy, which means there will still be some mistakes, so my apologies for having a less than perfect transcript, but I hope I can afford human transcription soon and I will solve this problem. However, the service is pretty good, and the transcript is almost perfect.

Transcript

Welcome to a new episode from English plus podcast. Today, we’re going to talk about idioms and those are ATM’s. We can use to express happiness and sadness, but first let me remind you that you can support the podcast by becoming a patron on Patreon. And when you become a patron, you will get a PDF practice worksheet.

[00:00:27] With every single episode we publish every day. So now without further ado, let’s talk about the idioms we can use to express happiness or sadness. Let’s start with happiness. Let’s start with extreme happiness. When you are extremely happy, you can express that by saying I’m on cloud nine on cloud nine, or I’m thrilled to bits.

[00:00:53] Thrilled to bits or I am, or you can say, I feel on top of the world, on top of the world, or I’m over the moon. Over the moon, or you can say I’m in seventh heaven in seventh heaven. So these are five idioms you can use to express your extreme happiness. And I hope you’re always extremely happy and you can use those idioms all the time.

[00:01:20] But we have other happiness, idioms, and unfortunately we have some sadness, idioms that we’re going to talk about because sometimes we are sad or sometimes we would want to use some idioms to describe sadness. So let’s start with other idioms that we can use to express happiness. We can say, get a kick out of something or get a real kick out of something.

[00:01:45] For example, we can say, I get a real kick out of going for a run first thing in the morning before anyone else is up. And what does that mean? That means very much enjoyed doing something. When you get a real kick out of something, you enjoy doing this thing very much. And this is an informal way, of course, to describe your happiness.

[00:02:07] Another idiom is do something for kicks. For example, Kate is keen to have a go at bungee jumping just for kicks, just for kicks. Here is our idiom and it means to do something because it is exciting and it is usually something dangerous. And that’s also is informal. And now for another ADM, and that is jumped for joy.

[00:02:32] For example, we say, Rhonda jumped for joy. When she heard that she’d won first prize. So jump for joy. The meaning of this is to be very happy and excited about something that has happened and another idiom to be floating or walking on air. For example, we say I’ve been walking on air ever since Chris and I started going out together and here walking on air means to be very happy about something good that has happened.

[00:03:01] And another common EDM we use when we want to describe our happiness is to say something makes your day. For example, it’s great to hear from you. It’s really made my day. And that means something makes you feel very happy. And now that we’ve talked about idioms, that we can use to describe happiness.

[00:03:21] Let’s move on to talk about idioms that we use to describe sadness. And here I will read you an excerpt from an email, and we have idioms in this email that describe sadness. So let’s read this excerpt together. Hope all goes well with you. Unfortunately, everyone here is out of sorts will, is down in the dumps because he doesn’t like his teacher this year.

[00:03:47] I’ve told him that it’s not the end of the world and that he’d better just grin and bear it. But I think he likes being a misery guts. And so he complains about her every night. Pat is also suffering from sour grapes because I got the role in the school play that she wanted. This puts a damper on every meal.

[00:04:07] So I’m really looking forward to staying with you at the weekend. So here, if we look back at this excerpt, we can see that we have a few idioms that describes something negative. And of course here, we’re talking about something sad. We have out of sorts down in the dumps. It’s not the end of the world.

[00:04:26] Just grin and bear it a misery guts, sour grapes, and puts a damper on. Now let’s talk about them one by one. Let’s start with, out of sorts in this excerpt, we said, unfortunately, everyone here is out of sorts. What does that mean? That means slightly unhappy, or we can use it also to talk about slightly ill or sick.

[00:04:50] So that was out of sorts. What about the next one down in the dumps in the excerpt we said will, is down in the dumps because he doesn’t like his teacher this year. And what does that mean to be down in the dumps to be down in the dumps means to be unhappy, simply unhappy. And it’s an informal way, of course, to describe being unhappy.

[00:05:11] And now for the next one, it’s not the end of the world. And here in the excerpt, we said, I’ve told him that it’s not the end of the world. What does that mean? That means what has happened. Won’t cause any serious problems. That’s what I’m trying to tell him. But we have the next idiom just grin and bear it.

[00:05:31] And that’s what I continued saying. When I said I’ve told him that it’s not the end of the world and that he’d better just grin and bear it. What does that mean? That means he should accept the situation. And that means he should accept the situation. He doesn’t like, because he can change it. So if I say to somebody just grin and bear it, that means just accept it and move on because there’s nothing you can do about it.

[00:05:55] Just grin and bear it. And now for the next idiom, a misery guts and hearing the excerpt, we said, but I think he likes being a misery guts. And so he complains about her every night. What does that mean when you are a misery guts? A misery guts is someone who complains all the time and is never happy. And that is very informal.

[00:06:18] So we don’t use it in formal situations at all. And now for the next one sour grapes in the excerpt, we said that is also suffering from sour grapes because I got the role in the school play that she wanted. What does that mean? What does it mean if you’re suffering from sour grapes, that means being jealous about something you can’t have sour grapes and for the last ADM for this episode, and that is puts a damper on now in the excerpt, after all these things described.

[00:06:52] And after all the gloomy mood that we talked about, we said, this puts a damper on every meal. What does that mean? That means that stops an occasion from being enjoyable. And sometimes them ner is used instead of Denver, we can say, put a dampener on, but put a dampers just fine. So that will be all for today.

[00:07:14] I hope you learned some useful idioms you can use to describe happiness and sadness. Remember, you can find the full transcript of this episode in a link, I will leave in the description and you can become a patron of English plus podcast on Patreon and get a PDF practice worksheet with its answer key.

[00:07:33] With every single episode we create. So that being said, this is your host, Danny saying, thank you very much for listening to another episode from English plus podcasts. And I will see you next time.

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