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Introduction

Embarking on the journey to master English tenses can be both exciting and challenging. As one of the core aspects of the language, understanding the intricacies of present, past, and future forms is crucial for clear and effective communication. However, learners often encounter common pitfalls that can hinder their progress. In this comprehensive guide, we will walk you through the most common mistakes in using English tenses, from the simple to the perfect continuous forms, and offer practical tips to help you avoid these errors and elevate your language skills.

Common Mistakes in Using the Present Simple Tense in English

The present simple tense is one of the most frequently used verb tenses in the English language. It is used to express general facts, habits, and routine actions. While it may seem straightforward, many non-native speakers and even some native speakers make mistakes when using this tense. In this article, we will examine the most common mistakes people make when using the present simple tense and provide tips on how to avoid them.

Incorrect Subject-Verb Agreement

One of the most common mistakes in using the present simple tense is the incorrect subject-verb agreement. It is essential to match the verb with the subject’s singularity or plurality. For example:

  • He go to the gym every day. (Incorrect)
  • He goes to the gym every day. (Correct)

Remember to add an -s to the base form of the verb when the subject is third-person singular (he, she, or it).

Using the Present Continuous Tense Instead of the Present Simple Tense

Another common mistake is using the present continuous tense instead of the present simple tense to describe habits or general truths. For example:

  • She is eating vegetables every day. (Incorrect)
  • She eats vegetables every day. (Correct)

Use the present simple tense for actions that are repeated, regular, or habitual and the present continuous tense for actions happening at the moment of speaking or around the present time.

Neglecting Time Adverbs

When using the present simple tense, it is essential to include appropriate time adverbs to convey the frequency or regularity of the action. Common time adverbs include always, often, usually, sometimes, and rarely. For example:

  • I go to the gym. (Vague)
  • I go to the gym every day. (Clear)

Using time adverbs helps make your statements more precise and informative.

Incorrect Use of Auxiliary Verbs in Questions and Negatives

To form questions and negatives in the present simple tense, it is crucial to use the auxiliary verb “do” or “does.” For example:

  • He not like coffee. (Incorrect)
  • He does not like coffee. (Correct)

Similarly, when forming questions:

  • She drink tea? (Incorrect)
  • Does she drink tea? (Correct)

Remember to use “do” for I, you, we, and they, and “does” for he, she, and it.

Overgeneralizing Irregular Verbs

Some learners may overgeneralize the rule of adding -s for third-person singular subjects, which leads to mistakes when dealing with irregular verbs. For example:

  • She has a book. (Correct)
  • She haves a book. (Incorrect)

Be aware of irregular verbs and their correct forms to avoid this mistake.

By understanding these common mistakes and learning how to correct them, you can improve your English language skills and become more confident in using the present simple tense. Always double-check your subject-verb agreement, use the appropriate tense, include time adverbs, and use auxiliary verbs correctly. With practice and patience, you will soon master the present simple tense and communicate more effectively in English.

Common Mistakes in Using the Present Continuous Tense in English

The present continuous tense, also known as the present progressive tense, is used to describe actions that are happening at the moment of speaking or around the present time. Despite being a fundamental tense in English, it is often misused, especially by non-native speakers. This article aims to highlight the common mistakes made when using the present continuous tense and provide tips on how to avoid them.

Confusing Present Continuous with Present Simple Tense

One of the most common mistakes is confusing the present continuous tense with the present simple tense. While the present simple tense is used to describe habits, general truths, or routine actions, the present continuous tense describes actions happening at the moment of speaking or around the present time. For example:

  • I’m working every day. (Incorrect)
  • I work every day. (Correct)

Incorrect Formation of the Present Continuous Tense

The present continuous tense is formed by using the auxiliary verb “to be” in the present tense (am, is, or are) followed by the present participle (verb + -ing). A common mistake is neglecting to use the correct form of “to be” or forgetting the -ing ending. For example:

  • She read a book. (Incorrect)
  • She is reading a book. (Correct)

Misusing Stative Verbs

Stative verbs, which describe states or conditions rather than actions, are generally not used in the continuous form. Common stative verbs include love, hate, believe, know, want, and need. For example:

  • I am knowing the answer. (Incorrect)
  • I know the answer. (Correct)

Keep in mind that some verbs can be both stative and dynamic, changing their meaning depending on the context.

Incorrect Use of Time Expressions

When using the present continuous tense, it is crucial to use appropriate time expressions to clarify the ongoing nature of the action. For example:

  • I am studying English this year. (Incorrect)
  • I am studying English at the moment. (Correct)

Using the appropriate time expressions, such as “at the moment,” “right now,” or “currently,” helps convey the intended meaning.

Neglecting Subject-Verb Agreement

Another common mistake when using the present continuous tense is neglecting the subject-verb agreement. Ensure that the auxiliary verb “to be” agrees with the subject in number and person. For example:

  • They is playing soccer. (Incorrect)
  • They are playing soccer. (Correct)

Understanding and avoiding these common mistakes will help you improve your English language skills and use the present continuous tense more accurately. Make sure to differentiate between present simple and present continuous tenses, use the correct form of “to be,” be mindful of stative verbs, include appropriate time expressions, and maintain subject-verb agreement. With practice and persistence, you can master the present continuous tense and communicate more effectively in English.

Common Mistakes in Using the Present Perfect Simple Tense in English

The present perfect simple tense is used to describe actions or events that occurred at an unspecified time in the past and have a connection to the present. This tense is formed using the auxiliary verb “have” or “has” followed by the past participle of the main verb. Despite its importance, many English learners struggle with using this tense correctly. In this article, we will discuss the most common mistakes people make when using the present perfect simple tense and provide tips on how to avoid them.

Confusing Present Perfect Simple with Simple Past Tense

One of the most common mistakes is confusing the present perfect simple tense with the simple past tense. While the simple past tense describes completed actions at a specific time in the past, the present perfect simple tense connects past actions to the present. For example:

  • I visited Paris. (Simple Past)
  • I have visited Paris. (Present Perfect Simple)

To avoid this mistake, remember that the present perfect simple tense does not specify when the action occurred, while the simple past tense does.

Incorrect Formation of the Present Perfect Simple Tense

The present perfect simple tense is formed using the auxiliary verb “have” or “has” followed by the past participle of the main verb. A common mistake is neglecting to use the correct form of “have” or using the base form or past simple form of the main verb. For example:

  • She has go to the store. (Incorrect)
  • She has gone to the store. (Correct)

Inappropriate Use of Time Expressions

Using specific time expressions, such as “yesterday,” “last year,” or “in 2020,” is incorrect when using the present perfect simple tense, as it requires the action to be connected to the present. For example:

  • I have seen him yesterday. (Incorrect)
  • I have seen him recently. (Correct)

Instead, use time expressions like “already,” “yet,” “ever,” “never,” “recently,” or “since.”

Misusing “For” and “Since”

When using the present perfect simple tense, it’s crucial to use “for” and “since” correctly. “For” is used to indicate a duration, while “since” refers to the starting point of the action. For example:

  • I have lived here since five years. (Incorrect)
  • I have lived here for five years. (Correct)

Neglecting Subject-Verb Agreement

Another common mistake when using the present perfect simple tense is neglecting the subject-verb agreement. Ensure that the auxiliary verb “have” or “has” agrees with the subject in number and person. For example:

  • They has finished their work. (Incorrect)
  • They have finished their work. (Correct)

By understanding and avoiding these common mistakes, you can improve your English language skills and use the present perfect simple tense more accurately. Be sure to differentiate between simple past and present perfect simple tenses, use the correct form of “have” and the past participle, choose appropriate time expressions, and maintain subject-verb agreement. With practice and attention to detail, you will soon master the present perfect simple tense and communicate more effectively in English.

Common Mistakes in Using the Present Perfect Continuous Tense in English

The present perfect continuous tense is used to describe ongoing actions or events that started in the past and continue up to the present. It is formed by combining the auxiliary verbs “have” or “has” with “been” and the present participle (-ing form) of the main verb. Despite its importance in expressing duration and continuity, many learners struggle with using this tense correctly. This article aims to identify the most common mistakes made when using the present perfect continuous tense and provide tips on how to avoid them.

Confusing Present Perfect Continuous with Present Perfect Simple Tense

A common mistake is confusing the present perfect continuous tense with the present perfect simple tense. While the present perfect simple tense emphasizes the completion or result of an action, the present perfect continuous tense focuses on the ongoing nature and duration of the action. For example:

  • I have read this book for two hours. (Incorrect)
  • I have been reading this book for two hours. (Correct)

Incorrect Formation of the Present Perfect Continuous Tense

The present perfect continuous tense is formed using the auxiliary verbs “have” or “has” combined with “been” and the present participle (-ing form) of the main verb. A common mistake is neglecting to use the correct auxiliary verb, omitting “been,” or using the incorrect form of the main verb. For example:

  • She has study for three hours. (Incorrect)
  • She has been studying for three hours. (Correct)

Misusing Stative Verbs

Stative verbs, which describe states or conditions rather than actions, are generally not used in the continuous form. Common stative verbs include love, hate, believe, know, want, and need. For example:

  • I have been knowing her for years. (Incorrect)
  • I have known her for years. (Correct)

Keep in mind that some verbs can be both stative and dynamic, changing their meaning depending on the context.

Inappropriate Use of Time Expressions

Using specific time expressions, such as “yesterday,” “last month,” or “in 2010,” is incorrect when using the present perfect continuous tense, as it requires the action to be connected to the present. For example:

  • They have been working on the project since last week. (Correct)
  • They have been working on the project last week. (Incorrect)

Instead, use time expressions like “for,” “since,” “recently,” or “lately” to convey the ongoing nature of the action.

Neglecting Subject-Verb Agreement

Another common mistake when using the present perfect continuous tense is neglecting the subject-verb agreement. Ensure that the auxiliary verb “have” or “has” agrees with the subject in number and person. For example:

  • They has been waiting for an hour. (Incorrect)
  • They have been waiting for an hour. (Correct)

By understanding and avoiding these common mistakes, you can improve your English language skills and use the present perfect continuous tense more accurately. Be sure to differentiate between present perfect continuous and present perfect simple tenses, use the correct auxiliary verbs and main verb form, be mindful of stative verbs, choose appropriate time expressions, and maintain subject-verb agreement. With practice and attention to detail, you will soon master the present perfect continuous tense and communicate more effectively in English.

Common Mistakes in Using the Past Simple Tense in English

The past simple tense is used to describe completed actions or events that occurred at a specific time in the past. Despite being one of the most fundamental tenses in English, many learners struggle with using it correctly. In this article, we will explore the most common mistakes people make when using the past simple tense and provide tips on how to avoid them.

Confusing Past Simple with Present Perfect Simple Tense

One of the most common mistakes is confusing the past simple tense with the present perfect simple tense. While the past simple tense describes completed actions at a specific time in the past, the present perfect simple tense connects past actions to the present. For example:

  • I have visited Paris in 2015. (Incorrect)
  • I visited Paris in 2015. (Correct)

Incorrect Formation of the Past Simple Tense

The past simple tense is formed by using the past form of the verb. For regular verbs, the past form is created by adding -ed to the base form. A common mistake is using the base form or present participle (-ing form) of the verb instead of the past form. For example:

  • She not sleep well last night. (Incorrect)
  • She did not sleep well last night. (Correct)

Neglecting Irregular Verbs

A significant challenge when using the past simple tense is remembering the correct past forms of irregular verbs. Many learners mistakenly apply the regular -ed ending to irregular verbs. For example:

  • We buyed a new car. (Incorrect)
  • We bought a new car. (Correct)

To avoid this mistake, familiarize yourself with common irregular verbs and their past forms.

Misusing Time Expressions

Using appropriate time expressions is crucial when using the past simple tense. Common time expressions used with this tense include “yesterday,” “last week,” “in 2010,” and “two days ago.” A common mistake is using present-oriented time expressions with the past simple tense. For example:

  • He visited her recently. (Incorrect)
  • He visited her last week. (Correct)

Incorrect Use of Auxiliary Verbs in Questions and Negatives

To form questions and negatives in the past simple tense, it is crucial to use the auxiliary verb “did” or “did not” (didn’t) followed by the base form of the main verb. For example:

  • She not called me. (Incorrect)
  • She did not call me. (Correct)

Similarly, when forming questions:

  • You visited the museum? (Incorrect)
  • Did you visit the museum? (Correct)

By understanding and avoiding these common mistakes, you can improve your English language skills and use the past simple tense more accurately. Be sure to differentiate between past simple and present perfect simple tenses, use the correct verb forms, familiarize yourself with irregular verbs, choose appropriate time expressions, and use auxiliary verbs correctly. With practice and attention to detail, you will soon master the past simple tense and communicate more effectively in English.

Common Mistakes in Using the Past Continuous Tense in English

The past continuous tense, also known as the past progressive tense, is used to describe ongoing actions or events that were happening at a specific time in the past. This tense is formed by using the past form of the auxiliary verb “to be” (was or were) followed by the present participle (-ing form) of the main verb. Despite its importance in conveying continuous past actions, many learners struggle with using it correctly. This article aims to identify the most common mistakes made when using the past continuous tense and provide tips on how to avoid them.

Confusing Past Continuous with Past Simple Tense

One of the most common mistakes is confusing the past continuous tense with the past simple tense. While the past simple tense describes completed actions at a specific time in the past, the past continuous tense emphasizes the ongoing nature of an action in the past. For example:

  • She read a book when I called her. (Incorrect)
  • She was reading a book when I called her. (Correct)

Incorrect Formation of the Past Continuous Tense

The past continuous tense is formed using the past form of the auxiliary verb “to be” (was or were) followed by the present participle (-ing form) of the main verb. A common mistake is neglecting to use the correct form of “to be” or using the base form or past simple form of the main verb. For example:

  • They eat dinner when the phone rang. (Incorrect)
  • They were eating dinner when the phone rang. (Correct)

Misusing Stative Verbs

Stative verbs, which describe states or conditions rather than actions, are generally not used in the continuous form. Common stative verbs include love, hate, believe, know, want, and need. For example:

  • He was knowing the answer. (Incorrect)
  • He knew the answer. (Correct)

Keep in mind that some verbs can be both stative and dynamic, changing their meaning depending on the context.

Inappropriate Use of Time Expressions

Using specific time expressions, such as “yesterday,” “last week,” or “in 2010,” is incorrect when using the past continuous tense, as it requires the action to be ongoing at a particular moment in the past. For example:

  • She was writing a letter yesterday. (Incorrect)
  • She was writing a letter when I arrived. (Correct)

Instead, use time expressions that emphasize the continuous nature of the action or use the past continuous tense in conjunction with another past action.

Neglecting Subject-Verb Agreement

Another common mistake when using the past continuous tense is neglecting the subject-verb agreement. Ensure that the auxiliary verb “to be” agrees with the subject in number and person. For example:

  • They was watching TV. (Incorrect)
  • They were watching TV. (Correct)

By understanding and avoiding these common mistakes, you can improve your English language skills and use the past continuous tense more accurately. Be sure to differentiate between past simple and past continuous tenses, use the correct form of “to be” and the present participle, be mindful of stative verbs, choose appropriate time expressions, and maintain subject-verb agreement. With practice and attention to detail, you will soon master the past continuous tense and communicate more effectively in English.

Common Mistakes in Using the Past Perfect Simple and Continuous Tenses in English

The past perfect simple and continuous tenses are used to describe actions or events that happened before another past action or event. The past perfect simple tense is formed using the auxiliary verb “had” followed by the past participle of the main verb, while the past perfect continuous tense is formed using “had” followed by “been” and the present participle (-ing form) of the main verb. Despite their importance in conveying the sequence of past events, many learners struggle with using these tenses correctly. This article aims to identify the most common mistakes made when using the past perfect simple and continuous tenses and provide tips on how to avoid them.

Confusing Past Perfect Simple with Past Perfect Continuous Tense

One of the most common mistakes is confusing the past perfect simple tense with the past perfect continuous tense. While the past perfect simple tense emphasizes the completion or result of an action before another past action, the past perfect continuous tense focuses on the ongoing nature and duration of the action before another past event. For example:

  • He had studied English for five years before he moved to London. (Past Perfect Simple)
  • He had been studying English for five years before he moved to London. (Past Perfect Continuous)

Incorrect Formation of the Past Perfect Simple and Continuous Tenses

The past perfect simple tense is formed using the auxiliary verb “had” followed by the past participle of the main verb, while the past perfect continuous tense is formed using “had” followed by “been” and the present participle (-ing form) of the main verb. A common mistake is neglecting to use the correct auxiliary verb or verb form. For example:

  • She had write the report before the meeting. (Incorrect)
  • She had written the report before the meeting. (Correct)
  • They had work on the project for two months. (Incorrect)
  • They had been working on the project for two months. (Correct)

Misusing Stative Verbs

Stative verbs, which describe states or conditions rather than actions, are generally not used in the continuous form, including the past perfect continuous tense. Common stative verbs include love, hate, believe, know, want, and need. For example:

  • I had been owning that car for ten years. (Incorrect)
  • I had owned that car for ten years. (Correct)

Keep in mind that some verbs can be both stative and dynamic, changing their meaning depending on the context.

Overusing the Past Perfect Tenses

The past perfect tenses should be used to clarify the sequence of past events when it is not evident from the context. Overusing these tenses can make sentences sound overly complex and unnatural. For example:

  • I had eaten dinner and had watched a movie. (Incorrect)
  • I ate dinner and watched a movie. (Correct)

Neglecting the Use of Past Perfect Tenses

Conversely, another common mistake is not using the past perfect tenses when needed to clarify the sequence of past events. For example:

  • After she left the house, she realized she forgot her keys. (Incorrect)
  • After she left the house, she realized she had forgotten her keys. (Correct)

Conclusion

By understanding and avoiding these common mistakes, you can improve your English language skills and use the past perfect simple and continuous tenses more accurately. Be sure to differentiate between past perfect simple and continuous tenses, use the correct auxiliary verbs and verb forms, be mindful of stative verbs, and use the past perfect tenses appropriately to convey the sequence of past events. With practice and attention to detail, you will soon master the past perfect simple and continuous tenses and communicate more effectively in English.

Common Mistakes in Using the Future Simple Tense (Will and Be Going To) in English

The future simple tense is used to express actions or events that will take place in the future. In English, there are two common ways to form the future simple tense: using “will” and using “be going to.” Despite their importance in conveying future intentions, plans, and predictions, many learners struggle with using these forms correctly. This article aims to identify the most common mistakes made when using the future simple tense with “will” and “be going to” and provide tips on how to avoid them.

Confusing the Use of “Will” and “Be Going To”

One of the most common mistakes is confusing the use of “will” and “be going to.” While both forms express future actions, they are used in different contexts. “Will” is typically used for spontaneous decisions, promises, offers, and predictions with no present evidence, while “be going to” is used for planned actions and predictions with present evidence. For example:

  • I think I will go to the beach this weekend. (Incorrect)
  • I think I am going to go to the beach this weekend. (Correct)
  • It will rain tomorrow. (Incorrect, if there is present evidence such as dark clouds)
  • It is going to rain tomorrow. (Correct)

Incorrect Formation of “Will” and “Be Going To”

A common mistake when using “will” and “be going to” is using incorrect forms or constructions. The future simple tense with “will” is formed by using the auxiliary verb “will” followed by the base form of the main verb. For “be going to,” the present form of the verb “to be” (am, is, or are) is followed by “going to” and the base form of the main verb. For example:

  • She will eats pizza tonight. (Incorrect)
  • She will eat pizza tonight. (Correct)
  • They is going to watch a movie. (Incorrect)
  • They are going to watch a movie. (Correct)

Neglecting Contractions

In spoken and informal written English, contractions are commonly used for “will” and “be going to.” Neglecting to use contractions can make your speech or writing sound overly formal or unnatural. For example:

  • I will call you later. (Correct, but may sound formal)
  • I’ll call you later. (Correct and more natural in informal contexts)
  • We are going to visit Paris. (Correct, but may sound formal)
  • We’re going to visit Paris. (Correct and more natural in informal contexts)

Misusing Time Expressions

Using appropriate time expressions is crucial when using the future simple tense with “will” and “be going to.” Common time expressions for future actions include “tomorrow,” “next week,” “in a few days,” and “soon.” A common mistake is using past-oriented time expressions with these future forms. For example:

  • She will call you yesterday. (Incorrect)
  • She will call you tomorrow. (Correct)

Inconsistent Use of Tenses in Conditional Sentences

The future simple tense with “will” is often used in the main clause of the first conditional to express the likely result of a hypothetical situation in the present or future. A common mistake is using other tenses or forms instead of “will” in these sentences. For example:

  • If it rains, we are going to stay home. (Incorrect)
  • If it rains, we will stay home. (Correct)

By understanding and avoiding these common mistakes, you can improve your English language skills and use the future simple tense with “will” and “be going to” more accurately. Be sure to differentiate between the use of “will” and “be going to,” use the correct forms and constructions, use contractions in informal contexts, choose appropriate time expressions, and maintain consistency in conditional sentences. With practice and attention to detail, you will soon master the future simple tense with “will” and “be going to” and communicate more effectively in English.

Common Mistakes in Using the Future Continuous, Perfect, and Perfect Continuous Tenses in English

The future continuous, perfect, and perfect continuous tenses are used to express various aspects of future actions or events. Despite their importance in conveying the duration, completion, or ongoing nature of future actions, many learners struggle with using these tenses correctly. This article aims to identify the most common mistakes made when using the future continuous, perfect, and perfect continuous tenses and provide tips on how to avoid them.

Confusing the Use of Future Continuous, Perfect, and Perfect Continuous Tenses

One common mistake is confusing the use of future continuous, perfect, and perfect continuous tenses. The future continuous tense is used to express ongoing actions at a specific time in the future, the future perfect tense is used to describe actions that will be completed before a certain time in the future, and the future perfect continuous tense is used to express the ongoing nature and duration of future actions up to a specific point in the future. For example:

  • They will be playing soccer at 5 PM. (Future Continuous)
  • They will have played soccer by 5 PM. (Future Perfect)
  • They will have been playing soccer for two hours by 5 PM. (Future Perfect Continuous)

Incorrect Formation of Future Continuous, Perfect, and Perfect Continuous Tenses

Another common mistake is using incorrect forms or constructions for these tenses. The future continuous tense is formed by using “will be” followed by the present participle (-ing form) of the main verb. The future perfect tense is formed using “will have” followed by the past participle of the main verb, while the future perfect continuous tense is formed using “will have been” followed by the present participle of the main verb. For example:

  • She will play tennis tomorrow evening. (Incorrect)
  • She will be playing tennis tomorrow evening. (Correct)
  • They will finish the project next week. (Incorrect)
  • They will have finished the project by next week. (Correct)
  • We will work on this task for three hours. (Incorrect)
  • We will have been working on this task for three hours by then. (Correct)

Misusing Time Expressions

Using appropriate time expressions is crucial when using the future continuous, perfect, and perfect continuous tenses. Common time expressions for these tenses include “by,” “at,” “for,” “in,” “by the time,” and “before.” A common mistake is using present-oriented time expressions with these future tenses. For example:

  • She will be studying now. (Incorrect)
  • She will be studying at 7 PM. (Correct)

Overusing the Future Continuous, Perfect, and Perfect Continuous Tenses

Overusing these tenses can make sentences sound overly complex and unnatural. It is important to use them only when necessary to convey specific aspects of future actions or events. For example:

  • I will be meeting my friends and we will be going to a movie. (Incorrect)
  • I will meet my friends, and we will go to a movie. (Correct)

Inconsistent Use of Tenses in Conditional Sentences

The future continuous, perfect, and perfect continuous tenses can be used in the main clause of conditional sentences to express the likely result of hypothetical situations in the present or future. A common mistake is using other tenses or forms instead of the appropriate future tense in these sentences. For example:

  • If it snows, we will go skiing. (Incorrect, if you want to emphasize the ongoing action)
  • If it snows, we will be skiing. (Correct)

By understanding and avoiding these common mistakes, you can improve your English language skills and use the future continuous, perfect, and perfect continuous tenses more accurately. Be sure to differentiate between the use of these future tenses, use the correct forms and constructions, choose appropriate time expressions, avoid overusing these tenses, and maintain consistency in conditional sentences. With practice and attention to detail, you will soon master the future continuous, perfect, and perfect continuous tenses and communicate more effectively in English.

Conclusion

Mastering English tenses is a vital step in becoming a proficient and confident speaker or writer. By understanding the distinctions between present, past, and future forms and their various aspects, and by avoiding the common mistakes outlined in this guide, you are well on your way to achieving a strong command of the language. Remember that practice is key; with dedication and consistent effort, you will soon find yourself navigating English tenses with ease and communicating your thoughts and ideas effectively in any situation.

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<a href="https://englishpluspodcast.com/author/dannyballanowner/" target="_self">Danny Ballan</a>

Danny Ballan

Author

Danny is a podcaster, teacher, and writer. He worked in educational technology for over a decade. He creates daily podcasts, online courses, educational videos, educational games, and he also writes poetry, novels and music.

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