Introduction

Learn the English Tenses in this new mini-grammar series from English Plus Podcast. The series will go on until we cover every single tense in English.

In this first episode, we will discuss the present simple and the present continuous.

Audio Podcast

PDF Practice Worksheet

Grammar | Learn the English Tenses Episode 01 by English Plus Podcast on Scribd

Transcript

We will start today, our mini series about grammar, and we will learn about the English dancers. We have 10 episodes in those 10 episodes. We will talk about all the English tenses that you need to know. We will start our first episode talking about the present.

[00:00:25] We will talk about the present continuous and the presence him. Well, now, while we’re talking about these tenses in this mini series, I just want to tell you that you need to think first about what you want to say. That is what we’re going to try and focus on. It’s not just about the mechanics of grammar, it is about what you want to say.

[00:00:45] And the tenses are only tools in your hands so that you can use to say what you mean and to say what you mean exactly. So that there is no confusion. That is the power of tenses. That is the useful thing you need to know about dances. And one more thing before we start, let me remind you that there is a PDF practice worksheet with every single episode and when the mini series is over, I will put all these exercises in one booklet and I will share it with you on our Patrion page and on our website, English plus podcast.com.

[00:01:16] Now, without further ado, let’s start talking about the English senses and we will start talking about the present continuous. Now, let’s start by studying this example situation. Sarah is in her car. She is on her way to work. We can say she’s driving to work. She is driving or she’s of course, if we want to use the contracted form of is so she’s driving to work or she is driving to work.

[00:01:44] What does that mean? That is present continuous of course, but what does it mean? This means she is driving now at the time of speaking, the action is not finished. So here we have two points that we need to think about. If we want to talk about things that are happening right now at the time of speaking and they’re not finished yet, we can use the present continuous for that.

[00:02:07] And here, before we continue talking about the other ways or the other uses of the present, continuous, why not stop for a second and talk about how we can form the present continuous. Now, as you could see, we said she’s driving. She is driving. Now here, the main verb, which is the verb that has the meaning is drive.

[00:02:28] We put that verb in ING, but to put that verb in ING, we need to add an auxiliary verb. And this auxiliary verb is verb to be. And since we’re talking about present continuous, so it is going to be verb to be in the present. M is or are. So I am driving. He, she, it is working for example, we, you, and they are doing, for example.

[00:02:56] So here we say, I am doing, she is doing, he is doing, they are doing, or we can use the contracted forms and we can say, I’m driving instead of I am he’s working and we are doing. That is work to be, and you should be familiar with using verb to be what we need to remember use verb, to be all the time, if you want to create, or if you want to form the present continuous and your main verb, the verb that has the meaningful it should be in ING.

[00:03:27] And the most important thing is when do we use the present continuous, when we want to talk about things that are happening at the time of speaking, and we’re talking about actions that are not finished yet. So I am doing something that means I started doing it and I haven’t finished I’m in the middle of doing it.

[00:03:46] That’s why we use the present continuous. So remember, that’s what I want to say. And if you have this intention in mind, this is what you want to talk about. Use the present continuous. For example, please don’t make so much noise. I’m trying to work. I’m trying to work. That means I started doing this thing, but this thing is not finished yet.

[00:04:07] I’m in the middle of doing another example. Let’s go out now. It isn’t raining anymore. Not it doesn’t rain or where’s Mark. Somebody is asking and the answer is he’s having a shower right now. He’s in the middle of the shower. He hasn’t finished yet. He’s in the middle of doing something. It is happening at the moment of speaking, not he has a shower.

[00:04:29] I’m not talking about what Mark does in the morning. Every day. No, I’m talking about what is happening right now, or how’s your new job? Are you enjoying it? No. I’m asking you about something that you’re in the middle of. You’re in the middle of your new job, right? You’re not fired yet. You haven’t quit yet.

[00:04:46] So are you enjoying it or not? Or what’s all this noise what’s going on or what’s happening? What’s going on, what’s happening because it is happening right now. It hasn’t finished yet. I can still hear the noise, but I don’t know what’s going on or what’s happening now. These are the obvious examples for the present continuous, but sometimes the action is not happening at the time of speaking.

[00:05:11] So it is not always the present. Continuous is about things that are happening at the time of speaking. No, sometimes it’s not. It’s not exactly that. Let’s take a look at this example. Now Steve talking to a friend on the phone and he says, I’m reading a really good book at the moment. It’s about a man who does this with us, dad.

[00:05:30] Well, if you notice, what did we say? Steve is talking to a friend on the phone. So at the moment of speaking is not reading the book. Is he a liar? Is he just lying to his friend? Not at all. Is he using the wrong tense? Also? Not. So here, Steve says I’m reading, but he’s not reading the book at the time of speaking.

[00:05:49] He means that he has started reading the book, but has not finished it yet. He’s in the middle of reading it. So that is more important than just what is happening at the moment of speaking. Yes, we can use the present continuous to talk about things that are happening at the moment of speaking. And that is key, but the more important meaning or the second layer of meaning for the present continuous is when we want to talk about things that have started, but have not finished yet.

[00:06:18] So here he has started reading the book, but he hasn’t finished yet. He’s in the middle of reading it. Now some more examples about that. We can say, for example, Kate wants to work in Italy, so she’s learning Italian. Maybe she’s not learning Italian at this very moment. Maybe she’s, uh, drinking a cup of coffee.

[00:06:37] Maybe she’s taking a shower. Maybe she’s sleeping. But around now. So the present continuous can be around now, but the key thing is that she has started learning Italian and she hasn’t finished yet. She’s in the middle of learning Italian. That’s why we can still use the present continuous to convey this meaning.

[00:06:58] Another example, some friends of mine are building their own house. They hope to finish it next summer. Well, I have no idea if they are building at this very moment of speaking. I don’t know. Maybe they are, maybe they’re not. But what I know for sure is that they have started to build the house and they haven’t finished yet.

[00:07:16] They’re still in the middle of it. All right now, let’s move on to another point. You can use the present continuous with today this week, this year periods around. Now, remember we said, present continuous is about what’s happening right now, or what’s happening around now. And these words or these time expressions mean periods around now today, this week, this year.

[00:07:40] So these things can be used with the present. Continuous, if you want. Like when we say you’re working hard today, not you work hard today. It’s not present simple. We will talk about present. Simple. Don’t worry. But for now we can say you’re working hard today, right? Or you’re working hard around now. Maybe you’re not working.

[00:07:57] Maybe I’m talking to you and you’re taking your break. Now. You’re not working at this very moment. But today around now you’re working hard. Or we can say the company I work for. Isn’t doing so well this year. So isn’t doing so well this year. I’m not talking about right at this very moment. Maybe it is.

[00:08:17] Maybe it’s not, but I’m talking about this year around now and you can use the present continuous for that as well. Now we use the present continuous. When we talk about a change that has started to happen. And we often use these verbs in this way. Getting, becoming, starting beginning changes, Jean improving, increasing, rising, falling, growing.

[00:08:40] We use these verbs because they indicate this change. We can use them to talk about this change that has started to happen. But remember the change is not over. We’re not talking about something that is done. That is finished. No, it is still happening. That’s continuous. That is the present. Continuous.

[00:08:59] It’s very important that it is not over yet. It is temporary, but it’s not over yet. So here, for example, I can ask you, is your English getting better, getting better? That is, I’m talking about a change that has started to happen, and hopefully it is still happening. Your English is getting better. That is the change that we want here in English.

[00:09:20] Plus for example, we want your English to keep getting better. So is your English getting better? Not does your English get better? It’s not in general. We’re talking about something that is a change of started to happen, but it’s not over yet. It is continuous. Or another example, the population of the world is increasing very fast and it’s still increasing.

[00:09:40] It’s not over or at first I didn’t like my job, but I’m starting to enjoy it. Now I’m starting to enjoy it. I still don’t enjoy it 100%, but I’m starting to enjoy it. The process has started to happen and it is still happening so we can use the present continuous. All right. So that was about the present.

[00:10:02] Continuous, we will talk more about the present continuous, but before we dig in and learn some more nuances about the present, continuous, let’s talk about the present. Simple, the other important tense we can use to talk about present. Now let’s start with talking about this example. Alex is a bus driver, but now he’s in bed asleep.

[00:10:22] He’s not driving a bus right now. He’s asleep. We can’t actually say he’s driving a bus because if you say he’s driving a bus, that means he’s driving the bus right now. That’s present continuous. Now, what I want to say is what he does in general, because he’s a bus driver. He drives a bus. So here he drives a bus.

[00:10:41] I’m talking about things that happen in general, or I’m talking about things in general that happen all the time or repeatedly or something that is true in general. But before we move on and talk about some more examples about these meanings, Let’s take a look quickly at how we can form the present.

[00:10:58] Simple. Now the present simple is simple. We keep the verb as it is in the affirmative. We don’t need any auxiliary verbs. We say, I work, you drive, you do, they do et cetera. But with heat sheet and it, we have to add an S we say he drives, she works. And it does. So that is in general how we can form the present simple.

[00:11:22] So now we said that we use the present simple to talk about things in general. We use it to say that something happens all the time or repeatedly, or that something is through in general. If that is what you want to say, if that is the meaning you intend to convey, use the present. Simple. For example, we can say nurses, look after patients in hospitals.

[00:11:45] Not today, not yesterday, not tomorrow. All the time. That is in general nurses. Look after patients in hospital. And if you say nurses are looking after patients, no. Are you talking about right at this very moment? Are you talking about something specific? If you’re talking about something specific, maybe it’s true.

[00:12:03] Yes. You can use the present continuous, but no, here, I’m talking about things in general. So I use the present simple another example. I usually go away at weekends. I’m not telling you what I’m doing this weekend. I’m not telling you anything specific. I’m telling you about things that happen in my life in general.

[00:12:23] I usually go away at weekends. That’s what I’m trying to tell you. That’s present simple because it’s in general or the earth goes round the sun. Well, the earth goes around the sun. It’s not just today. It’s not tomorrow. It’s all the time. It’s true. In general. It’s a scientific fact. The earth goes round the sun.

[00:12:42] Now maybe I’m telling you something about when the cafe opens in the morning. The cafe opens at seven 30 in the morning, opens up. Remember we add S the earth goes, the cafe opens up. There’s an S because here we have it. Right? So here, the cafe opens at seven 30 in the morning because it’s not just today.

[00:13:01] It’s not tomorrow. It’s not yesterday. It’s all the time. That’s their schedule. So they do it every day. The cafe opens at seven 30. Maybe it closes at 11. I don’t know, but that’s the point. We’re talking about things in general. Okay. Something that happens all the time or repeatedly or something that is true in general.

[00:13:18] But remember one more time, we use the verbs in present simple as they are. We don’t change anything if we are using I, you, we, or they, but if you want to use he, she or it, you have to add an S they teach, I teach, but my sister teaches, my brother teaches. I go, you go, but she goes, he goes, I do you do we do they do, but it does.

[00:13:49] He does. She does et cetera. I’ll forget that. That’s very important. It’s easy to forget. And here, since we’re talking about this S that we add to he, she it, and we sat in affirmative. We don’t use any auxiliary verbs. Yeah, that’s true in affirmative, but in negative or questions we use verb to do we use do.

[00:14:09] As an auxiliary. So here again, we use do, or does we use do with I, we, you and they, and we use does with he, she and it, but when we use do or does the main verb is always in zero form. We don’t worry about the main verb anymore because the S goes for do so. I’ll give you an example. If I say, do I, do we, do you, or do they work?

[00:14:33] All right. We know that with I, we, you, and they, we say work with no S. But what if I want to say does, does he, or does she, or does it yes, we use does with he, she, it that’s the auxiliary verbal. What about the main verb of the main verb is zero form. We say, does he work? Not works. We don’t use the S in two places.

[00:14:54] We don’t use the S in the auxiliary verb. And in the main verb? No. When you use it in the auxiliary verb, that’s enough. You don’t use it in the main verb again. So we say, does he work? Does she drive. Does it do. And the same goes, if we want to use it in negatives, we use it in negatives. We say, I don’t work.

[00:15:14] You don’t work or you don’t drive. And here, if I want to say he, she, or it, we use doesn’t obviously does not. He doesn’t. And again, He doesn’t drive now. He doesn’t drive zip. We don’t use the S in two places. We don’t use the S in the auxiliary verb. And in the main verb, no, only in the auxiliary verb when we have an auxiliary verb, and that is in negative and in questions.

[00:15:40] But as you saw earlier, that in affirmative, when we don’t use an auxiliary verb, we add the S to the main verb. Because the S doesn’t have any other place to go. There’s only this main verb and we have to use the S somewhere with he, she it, so we said, I have, she has, or I go, she goes, but here, because we have the auxiliary verb, we just put the Ester, the auxiliary, we just add the S to the auxiliary verb.

[00:16:07] And that’s it. The main verb goes with no changes at all with zero four. Well, let me give you some examples. I come from Canada. Where do you come from? Where do you, I’m talking about you. So it’s do, where do you come from? I don’t go away very often. And remember again? Yes, here. We’re talking about the forum, but even, you know, while we’re talking about the forum, try to look at these examples.

[00:16:30] I think about the meaning. I don’t go away very often. I’m not talking about right now. I’m not talking about something specific. I’m talking about things in general. What does this word mean? Not what is this word? Meaning not lack right now tomorrow. It means something else. No, it means something. And it means this thing over time, it doesn’t change the meaning of a word doesn’t change unless the context changes, which is something else.

[00:16:53] But this word means this. What does this word mean? Rice doesn’t grow in cold climates. That’s a fact it doesn’t change. We’ve tried it, it didn’t work. So rice doesn’t grow in cold climates. Now in the following examples do is also the main verb. And that is kind of confusing now. Yes, we use do as an auxiliary verb, but sometimes the main verb is also do so what do we do about that?

[00:17:20] What do we do about that? And you see that I use do twice. What do we do about that? Do you do doesn’t do you simply use it twice? That’s all. All right. So for example, what do you do? And that’s a very common question. When you want to ask a person what he or she does in life, and the person can say, I work in a shop, or I can say he’s always so lazy.

[00:17:41] He doesn’t do. Anything to help the main verb is do, but obviously here he’s lazy. He doesn’t do anything to help. So there’s no problem in using dude twice. It might sound kind of strange to you. It might sound kind of confusing. What does that mean? Do you do I don’t do he doesn’t do well. That’s what’s fine.

[00:18:02] The first do is just an auxiliary verb. We use it for a purpose and this purpose is to make the sentence negative or a question. That’s all. It doesn’t have any extra meaning. But the verb is do fine. I can use do twice. No problem. All right. He doesn’t do that’s okay. You can use do twice if do, happens to be the main verb as well.

[00:18:24] So that being said, let’s talk about some other points and some other uses of the present. Simple. And we use the present simple to say how often we do things is that for example, I get up at eight o’clock every morning. I’m talking about how often I do that. I’m talking about my habits, right. Things I do repeatedly all the time.

[00:18:44] I get up at eight o’clock every morning. How often do you go to the dentist? Maybe once a year. Maybe only when I have a Tuesday, maybe I just don’t go to the dentist at all. If I don’t feel pain or maybe I go every six months to have a checkup, maybe. So how often do you go to the dentist? I use a present simple here.

[00:19:04] Julie doesn’t drink tea very often. I’m also talking about how often Julie drinks, tea. How often does she drink tea? She doesn’t drink tea very often. Robert usually goes away two or three times a year. I’m talking about how often Robert goes away. He goes away two or three times every year. So that is about also another use, another important use for the present.

[00:19:29] Simple, another important meaning. Remember, I will say that again and again, first start with the meaning first start with what you want to say and then think about what tends goes with the meaning you have in mind, not the other way around. Not learn the tenses first and then learn what you want to say.

[00:19:48] It doesn’t work this way. That’s make sense. Right. First you have to think about what you want to say. It’s not about think about you. You want to say something, right? You have to think about the meaning you want to convey. That’s the key, that’s the important thing. And then the tenses are just tools that you can use to convey the meaning you have in mind.

[00:20:08] So if the meaning you have in mind is to talk about how often you do things or somebody does things. All right. You can use the present simple for that. Now let’s talk about, I promise and I apologize. Sometimes we do things by saying something. For example, when you promise to do something, you can say, I promise when you suggest something, you can say, I suggest, and for those, we usually use the present simple.

[00:20:33] So we say, I promise I won’t be late. Not I’m promising or what do you suggest I do not. What are you suggesting? I do or something. I suggest that you do this, you do that. And in the same sense or in the same way we say, I apologize. I advise, I insist, I agree. I refuse, et cetera. And we usually use those in the present.

[00:20:54] Simple. So now that we have talked about the present continuous and the present simple let’s compare these side-by-side. Now, the present continuous, I’m doing the present simple. I do present continuous. We use it for things happening at or around the time of speaking, remember at or around the time of speaking.

[00:21:13] But the most important thing is that the action is not complete, but when we use the simple, we use the present simple, we use it for things in general or things that happen repeatedly. Let’s take a look at a couple of examples and compare how we can use the same verb. But once in the present, continuous and once in the present, simple, now we can say the water is boiling.

[00:21:34] Be careful. You’re standing next to it. Or maybe you just want to go and do whatever you want to do. Tea, coffee, et cetera. The water is boiling. I mean, right now, right now it’s boiling do something about it at the time of speaking and that is present continuous. That’s what I want to say. Perfect. But what if I want to talk about water in general and something that is a fact about water and I still use the present continuous.

[00:21:57] I don’t think so. We say, for example, water boils at 100 degrees Celsius, water boils at 100 degrees Celsius. Every time it reaches 100 degrees Celsius, it’s going to boil. That is a fact. It’s not just about now. It happens all the time. That’s a scientific fact actually. So here, because I want to say this meaning because I have this meaning in mind, I don’t use the present.

[00:22:20] Continuous. I use the present simple water boils at 100 degrees Celsius. Now let’s move on to another example. Listen to those people. What language are they speaking? I mean, Right now, some people are just standing. Maybe not too close. I can hear them talk. They’re talking, they’re speaking a language. I can’t understand what language are they speaking?

[00:22:44] I mean, right now, That is what’s happening at the moment. And you’re trying to understand what these people are, what language these people are speaking, what language are they speaking right now? But if you want to ask this question in general, you don’t say, what language are you speaking? It doesn’t make any sense.

[00:23:00] You’re asking about the language you speak in general, or maybe many languages who knows here. You may go like, excuse me, do you speak English? Not are you speaking English? You’re not speaking. I’m asking you. It doesn’t make any sense. I can’t use the present. Continuous here. I’m asking you if you speak English or not, because if you speak English very well, I’m going to ask you a couple of questions.

[00:23:20] I’m lost. I want to find my way here, somewhere in France or in Germany or in some other country where they don’t necessarily speak English. So I have to ask, excuse me, do you speak English? That’s a general question. These speaking issue in general, going back to the other example, listen to those people.

[00:23:37] I mean, right now they’re speaking, they’re talking to each other and it’s a language. I cannot understand. What language are they speaking? Is it Italian? Is it French? Is it German? Is it Russian? Is it Arabic? Is it Chinese? What language is that? What language are they speaking? That’s a different question.

[00:23:55] That’s a different meaning. So here again, think about the meaning you have in mind. That’s key. Let’s move to another example. Let’s go out it. Isn’t raining. Now look outside. If you look outside, you’re going to see, it’s not raining. We can go out. I’m talking about something that’s happening right now.

[00:24:14] Look outside. It’s raining. Oh, we can go out. It’s raining. But now no, look outside. It’s not raining. We can go out. That’s good. I’m talking about things that are happening at the time of speaking or around the time of speaking. But if I want to talk about rain in general, and I want to talk about how often it drains in summer, that’s a different story I’m not talking about now.

[00:24:34] I’m not talking about what’s happening around the time of speaking. I’m talking about what happens in general. So I can say it doesn’t drain very much in summer. Maybe in this area, maybe in your area, wherever you are in the world, maybe it’s the opposite. I don’t know. But let’s say for example, here, it doesn’t rain very much in summer.

[00:24:54] That’s a fact, or that is something in general. Well, my train this summer, I don’t know, but it doesn’t rain very much. That’s what I’m trying to say. It’s in general. Let’s talk about another example. I’m busy. I say that to someone and this person can ask me, what are you doing? You’re busy. Well, while you’re doing, what are you doing right now?

[00:25:12] I mean, right now you say you’re busy, you’re busy doing what, what are you doing at the time of speaking right now? And the action is not complete, obviously. So here we use the present continuous. But if I want to ask you about what you usually do at weekends, It’s not right now. I’m asking you about what you do in general or what happens repeatedly or what you usually do actually.

[00:25:34] What do you usually do at weekends? Not what are you usually doing at weekends? It doesn’t make any sense. I’m not asking you about things that are happening at the moment of speaking. No. I’m asking you about what happens in general. What do you usually do at weekends? Another example, I’m getting hungry.

[00:25:52] Let’s go and eat. I’m getting hungry. It’s happening. This change. I can feel it in my stomach. I can feel it crawling up all the way to my head. And I can’t think anymore I’m getting hungry. Let’s go and eat it’s happening right now. But if I want to talk about what happens to me, usually I can say I always get hungry in the afternoon.

[00:26:12] It’s not now. Maybe it’s the morning now and I’m not hungry now. All right. But I’m telling you what happens to me in the afternoon. I always get hungry in the afternoon. That is something in general. Right now. We also need to think about the present continuous and the present simple as temporary and permanent.

[00:26:28] I mean, the present continuous usually talks about temporary situations, things that are happening and are still happening, but they will continue for a short time. At least it’s the way I see it. It might not get my go on forever, but remember, it’s not about what it is. It’s about what you think it is.

[00:26:46] It’s about what you want to say when you want to talk about something. If you think this thing is temporary. All right, go ahead and use the present continuous with them. If you think this situation is permanent, you can use the presence simple for it. I’ll give you an example. Now, what if I say I’m living with some friends until I find a place of my own, I’m living with some friends, even if I don’t say the rest of the sentence until I find a place of my own.

[00:27:11] If I just say I’m living with some friends, people will automatically understand that this is a temporary situation. I’m not going to live here forever. It’s a temporary situation. I’m living with some friends. Until I find a place of my own until I moved to another city until I finished my studies out.

[00:27:29] All right. But the point is, when you say I’m living, when you use the present continuous, that means the situation is temporary. This thing is going to continue for a short time on a temporary basis. It’s not going to happen forever. But when we say, for example, my parents live in London, what does that mean?

[00:27:49] That is a permanent situation. Maybe they will move out someday. I don’t know, but they live in London. That’s a permanent thing. They have lived there all their lives. And here you might ask, does it have to be that they have lived there all their lives? What if they have just moved to London? Can I say that they live in London?

[00:28:07] Well, yes and no. It depends. It depends on how you see it. If you see that they’re living in London, On a temporary basis until they find another city or maybe because my father works in an international company and he has to relocate all the time and we go with him. So we cannot say that we live in London.

[00:28:26] We are living in London for now, until they relocate him to another city. And then we go with him. So it depends on what you want to say. If you see the situation as permanent, use the present simple. If you see the situation as temporary is the present continuous. Now, for example, you can look at one of your friends and say, you’re working hard today.

[00:28:44] That’s not always the case, right. You’re working hard today. And he can say, yes, I have a lot to do. Or if you want to talk about somebody and say that Joe isn’t lazy. You’re talking about a permanent thing about Joe. You’re not talking about what’s happening right now. You’re not talking about a temporary thing.

[00:28:59] He works hard most of the time. Right? So remember that it’s not just about happening now or around now and happens in general. Remember this, because this is a very important key to differentiate or to know which tends to use, which is the right tense to use. Is it temporary? Is it permanent? If it is temporary, we can use the present.

[00:29:20] Continuous. If it is permanent, we can use the present simple. And now let’s wrap up the first episode of our series and talk about, I always do, or I’m always doing now. I always do something that means I do it every time. Like I always go to work by car. Not I’m always going. I’m telling you about what happens all the time.

[00:29:40] I do it every time repeatedly, right? But I’m always doing something that has a special meaning. That means I do it too often or more often than normal. For example, I’ve lost my keys again. I’m always losing them. I’m not happy about it. All right. I lose my keys more often that I want, or more often than normal.

[00:30:01] I am always losing them. I’m always losing them. That means I lose them too often or more often than normal. For example, Paul is never satisfied. He’s always complaining for God’s sake. He complains too much. He’s always complaining. So here. You can use that to talk about something that you don’t really like.

[00:30:20] You can criticize people by using this expression, always with the present. Continuous, he’s always complaining. He’s always doing this. He’s always doing that. Or she’s always obviously, or whoever you’re always looking at your phone. Don’t you have anything else to do? I mean, we’re sitting here, we’re supposed to talk, right.

[00:30:39] And you’re always looking at your phone, man. That’s more often than normal, more often than it should be. We’re here to talk, not for you to look at your phone. So here we can use this expression. You’re always looking at your phone. Don’t you have anything else to do? And with that being said, I guess that’s enough for one episode.

[00:30:58] I hope you found the information useful. And please, if you want to make the most of our series, take the link. You can find in the description of this episode and go to our website, English plus podcast.com. You will find the PDF practice works. She there, because you will need this to practice what you’ve learned.

[00:31:13] I mean, we talked about a lot of things, right? If you don’t practice these things, trust me, you will forget them very soon. Don’t you don’t need to forget those. Right. And we have everything you need on our website. So why would you want to waste that? Go to our website, take the link. You can find it inscription and take your English with it to the next level.

[00:31:31] We will help you do that. So do it. Of course. Let me remind you again, that in this series, we’re talking about the English senses. We have 12 fences that we’re going to talk about, but I don’t want you to think about densities. As I said in the beginning as just mechanics, we’re going to learn tens one, 10 students, three, et cetera.

[00:31:47] We use that here. We form that like that. It’s not about that. It’s about the meaning. It’s about what we want to say. That’s the most important thing, because we’re using tenses, we’re learning grammar, actually to learn how to speak. Right. If it doesn’t help us speak better or write better, obviously, why are we learning grammar in the first place?

[00:32:04] If it doesn’t help us produce better English, whether both in speaking or in writing, it’s useless. Think about it this way. And if you find this episode useless, Don’t listen to the rest of the series because that’s useless. That’s a waste of time. Grammar is supposed to make your speaking and writing better, more accurate.

[00:32:24] That’s what you have to put in mind and we will continue talking about the other tenses. And other nuances and comparisons and all that. And other meanings, obviously in the rest of this mini series that we talk about, learn the English dances. We have 10 episodes. This is the first episode. So we have nine more episodes to go one every day.

[00:32:44] So if you stick around in two weeks, we will have talked about all of the English tenses and here, by the way, I use the future. Perfect. We will have talked. All right. So if you want to learn how we can use that, why we use that stick around, this is your host, Danny. I would like to thank you very much for listening to this premium episode from English plus, and I will see you again in other episodes from English plus and in the remaining episodes from this mini series. [00:33:09] Thanks again, and take care.

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